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Sunday, May 24, 2020

The Reverend Neli Miranda Lopez: A new world is emerging from this pandemic and requires us to be strengthened, empowered and willing to proclaim the good news of Jesus.


Seventh Sunday of Easter
John 15:1-11
Rev. Neli Miranda

Easter Season is celebrated for 50 days (seven weeks), and today we begin the seventh week of celebration. During this time we have proclaimed the triumph of Life over death as we celebrated the presence of the risen Jesus among us. During this particular Easter season (2020), our proclamation of Life acquired a special meaning in light of the terrible COVID-19 pandemic. Thus, this Easter time led us on a path of faith where we vividly experienced the presence of the risen Jesus among us as we walked through times of darkness and death. Jesus, emerging victorious over death, revealed to us that darkness and death do not have the last word, for Life is stronger than death.
Now, we are leaving this time of Easter and approaching a new season. Last Thursday, we celebrated the Ascension of Jesus into heaven and next Sunday we celebrate Pentecost. These glorious events marked a great beginning for Jesus´ disciples who were still in Jerusalem and ready to go forth into the world. In the same way, these are great events for us, too, because in them we find our foundations as a church.
St. Luke in the Books of Acts (1, 1-11) tells us that, after his resurrection, Jesus presented himself alive to his disciples, appearing to them during forty days, and teaching them about the Kingdom of God. After this time, the disciples, women and men who had been following Jesus, were comforted and strengthened. So, they were ready to move forward and become a great community.  On Ascension Day Jesus commanded them to proclaim the good news beginning from Jerusalem to the ends of the world. Also, they were told to stay in Jerusalem to wait for the promise of the Father, the Holy Spirit, “I am sending upon you what my Father promised… you will be clothed with power from on high" (St. Luke 24, 49). Therefore, the ascension of Jesus is the “grand finale” for Easter Season and a great prelude to Pentecost and the subsequent great development of the early Christian community. We will see that after Pentecost, the fearful group of disciples we met on the resurrection day will become a community and will initiate the proclamation of Jesus´ good news. They will begin this great mission after being infused and empowered by the Holy Spirit.
Today´s Gospel is about the prayer of Jesus on behalf of his disciples (Ch. 17).  This prayer comes at the end of Jesus’ discourse at the Last Supper, before facing the cross and death. This prayer is known as the High Priestly prayer. This title is based on the figure of the High Priest among Jews, who mediated for the whole nation before God.  So, here we see Jesus as a High Priest interceding before God for his disciples. He prayed, “I am no longer in the world, but they are in the world… Holy Father, protect them in your name that you have given me, so that they may be one, as we are one” (John 17,11).  The use of world here is related to the unjust and corrupted world/system that lives in opposition to God. So, Jesus knows that his disciples are going to face an unjust and evil system which produces inequalities and inequities among the peoples. This is the antilife world/system that rejects all who seek justice and peace. No wonder the Holy Spirit, the Divine Presence, comes to empower Jesus´ disciples. 
Through this prayer Jesus interceded not only for his disciples of the first century but for the greater community of faith of all ages,  “I ask not only on behalf of these, but also on behalf of those who will believe in me through their word,  that they may all be one” (John 17,20-21).  Isn’t it great that Jesus prayed of us, the Christians of the 21st century? He interceded for us and commended us into the caring hands of God.
Today, we celebrate the exaltation of Jesus and his great gifts for his community.  He teaches us that when we trust in God, even the time of death is turned into Life, into a new beginning. Hence, today, as we continue facing this time of pandemic, we are confident in our coming liberation and a new beginning. We hope to emerge stronger from this time of trial and renewed as disciples of Jesus.
Today, as we culminate the path of Easter, we are ready to move forward; we are ready to receive the gift of Holy Spirit and go forth into the world. A new world is emerging from this pandemic and requires us to be strengthened, empowered and willing to proclaim the good news of Jesus.

May the exalted Jesus bless us today and inspire us to continue hopeful on our journey. May the coming Pentecost day bring us great blessings and a new mission. 
Amen.
Neli+



Neli+ Miranda



Greetings and blessings in the name of our Lord, Jesus Christ
Please, let us know if you have pastoral needs and/or wish personal, online, or telephone communications during this period of Coronavirus isolation.
Email:
The Reverend Neli Miranda Lopez
nelimirandalopez@gmail.com

We will include you in our informal support circle and add you to our prayer list.
You can also receive personally directed private prayers, Bible readings and pastoral reflections during this time.  If you wish to have special spiritual requests and needs we welcome them.

The Reverend Neli Miranda Lopez

Priest-in-charge
St. Alban Episcopal Mission
Antigua, Sacatepequez, Guatemala
The Episcopal Church WELCOMES EVERYONE

Monday, May 18, 2020

A MESSAGE FROM THE BISHOPS SENIOR WARDEN: At St. Alban’s in Antigua, we have strengthened our on line communications for worship and networking fellowship during this time of "Quedese en Casa" Elizabeth Bell


Beloved Parishioners and Friends of St. Alban Anglican/Episcopal Mission, Antigua Guatemala:

          We hope you and your family are safe and well and your faith remains strong through these extremely difficult times. Antigua is also experiencing challenging times as the country has been on a full and/or partial lockdown as ordered by the President Alejandro Giammattei of Guatemala since March 16th .  For most of Antiguas inhabitants, the main source of income is tourism.  Travel has been affected worldwide, including Guatemala, but our borders and airports remain closed. All physical church services, all denominations, were suspended at the same time to avoid crowded enclosed spaces. Our churches remain closed.

We invite you to join us on our facebook page at https://www.facebook.com/conventoconcepcionhistorical/  and our blog http://saintalbansantiguaguatemala.blogspot.com/. We have our weekly sermons available for you to review at any time on the blog (scroll down right sidebar for index). We also offering our regular Sunday 10am service via zoom (see facebook page for link/code for easy access/participation) – a helpful new addition to our Episcopal/Anglican Communion outreach ministry activities. Join us on Zoom! 


You may also wish to contact the Rev. Neli Miranda, priest-in-charge, at nelimirandalopez@gmail.com, with pastoral requests, special prayer requests and online personal consultations..

We hope to enjoy our in-person fellowship again soon and please remember the Episcopal Church WELCOMES everyone and everyone means everyone! 

Meanwhile, stay home, stay safe and peace be with you,


Elizabeth Bell
Senior Warden, Bishops Committee
St. Alban Episcopal Mission
Casa Convento Concepcion
Antigua, Sacatepequez
Guatemala

Sunday, May 17, 2020

" We believe in God who walks with us today and surrounds us with loving care as we go through this pandemic. We believe in God who dwells within us through the ongoing presence of the Holy Spirit." Neli+


Sixth Sunday of Easter.  St. John 14, 15-21
Rev. Neli Miranda

I will not leave you orphaned…
There is a consensus among biblical scholars that Joseph, Jesus' father, died early.  Luke the evangelist tells us that when Jesus was twelve, he and his parents went to Jerusalem for the festival of the Passover. After this account, there are no more testimonies of Joseph's presence in the midst of his family and community. It is very likely that he would have died soon after and so, Jesus grew up fatherless. 
In ancient times, particularly in Galilee first-century, fatherless meant trouble: “a fatherless Jesus would have been without social identity. He would have been excluded from being called a child of Abraham, that is, a child of God… He would have been excluded from the privilege of being given a daughter in marriage” (Van-Aarde, 2001, p. 4).  So it seems that Jesus experienced and faced the stigma of orphanhood: vulnerability, poverty, discrimination and isolation. These experiences shaped Jesus´ faith and led him to an encounter with God as his father. Hence, the image of God as father was ever-present in the life of Jesus and his teachings. Jesus called God his father and taught his disciples to do so as well. He said that God is the father of all and talked about God as the loving father who cares with great dedication for his children. Thus, Jesus´ father is loving, protecting, providing and forgiving father. Hence, nobody is an orphan in Jesus´ community.
Today, we read that an orphaned feeling is arising among Jesus´ disciples as he announces that he is going to leave them. Before, he is going to face the cross and death; thus, an imminent time of trial is coming to the community of Jesus.  As this critical time approaches, Jesus prepares his disciples to cope with this.  They are anxious, desperate and with a feeling of great emptiness, and Jesus encourages them with a great expression “I will not leave you orphaned.”
Jesus knows how they are feeling; they feel orphaned, and desolate. He knows that feeling. And right then, Jesus says “I will not leave you orphaned; I am coming to you” (14, 18). Jesus thinks of them as fatherless children whom he is leaving in the world, but he assures he is not leaving them vulnerable. Just as Jesus was comforted by the divine presence during his childhood, now he comforts his disciples by saying “My father will give you another Advocate, to be with you forever” (14, 15). Jesus speaks here about the coming of the Holy Spirit and uses this great concept “Advocate,” which can be interpreted as Comforter, Counselor, and helper. Therefore, Jesus assures his disciples they are part of a great community where nobody is alone, isolated or unprotected.
Today, in the midst of these hard times, when we live isolated, when we see our brothers and sisters suffering due the impact of COVID 19, when we live with great uncertainty about the future, it is natural for us to feel overwhelmed with many emotions. As a result, we can feel orphaned and vulnerable in the midst of this situation. Jesus knows that feeling! And with a calming voice, he assures us that we are not orphaned, that we are not alone, for we are part of a great community where the Divine Presence fills and surround us.
Therefore we can say confidently that we believe in the God of Jesus, the God Jesus trusted in, the God to whom Jesus entrusted his childhood and vulnerability, the God whom Jesus called father, and the God who raised him from the dead. We believe in God who walks with us today and surrounds us with loving care as we go through this pandemic. We believe in God who dwells within us through the ongoing presence of the Holy Spirit. We believe in the Holy Spirit, the Divine Presence who fills us with health and hope.
We therefore remain confident that our loving father, who cares for the little ones and the most vulnerable, will continue caring and protecting all who feel abandoned and orphaned during this time of pandemic. Also, we remain hopeful as we await the coming of the Holy Spirit, our comforter and helper.
Amen
Neli+
Bibliography reference:
Van-Aarde, A. (2001). Fatherless in Galilee. Jesus as Child of God. Harrisbur, Pennsylvania: Trinity Press International.


Neli+ Miranda


Greetings and blessings in the name of our Lord, Jesus Christ
Please, let us know if you have pastoral needs and/or wish personal, online, or telephone communications during this period of Coronavirus isolation.
Email:
The Reverend Neli Miranda Lopez
nelimirandalopez@gmail.com

We will include you in our informal support circle and add you to our prayer list.
You can also receive personally directed private prayers, Bible readings and pastoral reflections during this time.  If you wish to have special spiritual requests and needs we welcome them.

The Reverend Neli Miranda Lopez

Priest-in-charge
St. Alban Episcopal Mission
Antigua, Sacatepequez, Guatemala
The Episcopal Church WELCOMES EVERYONE

Sunday, May 10, 2020

Jesus' Voice: "Do not let your heart be troubled. Believe in God, believe also in me.” Neli+


Belief. Concept word on a blackboard background royalty free stock images

Fifth Sunday of Easter.  St. John 1:1-14
Rev. Neli Miranda

“Do not let your hearts be troubled”
Do not let your hearts be troubled! – Jesus says to his disciples in the midst of the Passover meal, the Last Supper. The disciples are filled with sadness, fear and worry. Just some minutes ago they were laughing and having a great moment with Jesus; now, they feel perturbed and distressed.
 Knowing that his hour is drawing near, Jesus told his disciples that he is about to leave them.  Jesus also announced that one of them is going to betray him (Judas). In the midst of this conversation Peter has said, “I will lay down my life for you, Jesus.” And Jesus replied, “Will you lay down your life for me? Very truly, I tell you, before the cock crows, you will have denied me three times (13, 38). The news is not encouraging, a time of trial is coming.  No wonder the disciples became troubled.
This is a time of distress, confusion and uncertainty in Jesus’ community. The disciples are filled with worry; they realize that they are going through a hard time. And Jesus can read the anxious thoughts in his disciples´ souls.  Hence, right in the middle of their despair, Jesus says to them, “Do not let your hearts be troubled. Believe in God, believe also in me (14, 1).
Note that Jesus does not promise to take away this time of trial but encourages them to cope with this through faith. Jesus asks them to not be cast down and disquieted.  How can this be achieved? When Jesus encourages his disciples, “Do not let your hearts be troubled.”  He uses the word, “heart.”   Heart is not only related to a physical organ but also to knowing, feeling, and willing, which means our whole being involved in facing a hard situation. So, Jesus mean do not let troubles take over your life and paralyze you but fill your heart with trust in God. 
One of the practices of Jewish spirituality was to recite at least twice a day the prayer Shema Israel, which is a creed to reaffirm their belief in God. Now, Jesus urges his disciples to go beyond a ritual religious statement and embody their faith with the living presence of God. Moreover, Jesus says, “Believe also in me.” In this way, Jesus reaffirms himself as the One sent by God. “I am in the Father and the Father is in me,” – Jesus stated before his disciples. Thus, the faith of Jesus´ disciples is strengthened; they now know that they are part of a greater community, the communion of God the Father and Jesus the Son: “If you know me, you will know my Father also. From now on you do know him and have seen him.” (14, 7).
And then, the hard time came. Judas betrayed Jesus, Jesus was arrested by the roman soldiers, Peter denied Jesus three times and most of the disciples ran away. Only a few women stayed with Jesus at the cross and at his burial. Seems, it is all over…  Nevertheless, this is not the end.
The disciples are facing a time of trial, and dealing with it. They are learning, growing, and becoming stronger. And, as they go through this time of death and fear, God walks with them and sustains them. They will witness Jesus´ resurrection, because God´s response to death is Life.  
On the day of the resurrection, they still were confused, doubtful, and fearful. However, while their hearts were troubled, they received the good news that Jesus was risen! And then, they began to think about Jesus´ words, “Do not let your heart be troubled. Believe in God, believe also in me…”
There is much today for us to feel troubled. Death threatens us… we are going through a time of pandemic. And as the impact and consequences of Covid-19 increase and spread every day – like poverty, unemployment, and hunger – fear and despair reach out and touch us. Thus, many of us, are troubled!
In the midst of this troubled time, a calming voice tells us, “Do not let your heart be troubled. Believe in God, believe also in me.” This is Jesus´ voice who reminds us of our Christian faith, of the creed we have always recited: “We believe in one God, the Father, the Almighty, maker of heaven and earth… We believe in one Lord, Jesus Christ… he was crucified under Pontius Pilate; he suffered death and was buried. On the third day we rose again… We believe in the Holy Spirit, the giver of life. We look for the resurrection of the dead and the life of the world to come.” What a powerful statement of faith!! So, “Do not let your heart be troubled.”
Today in the midst of this pandemic, Jesus reminds us that this is not the end but a new beginning. He reminds us that we believe in the God of Life who raised Jesus from the dead. Thus, our hope is that we, humanity, will emerge from this time of death. In this way, we remain faithful in the face of death for death is not the last word but Life.
May this time be a time to strengthen our faith, a time of learning, a time of growth, a time to dream, and a time to recreate the life of the world to come! May this time be a time of faith and hope!
Today once again, Jesus says, “Do not let your heart be troubled!”

Amen
Neli+



Neli+ Miranda

Greetings and blessings in the name of our Lord, Jesus Christ
Please, let us know if you have pastoral needs and/or wish personal, online, or telephone communications during this period of Coronavirus isolation.
Email:
The Reverend Neli Miranda Lopez
nelimirandalopez@gmail.com

We will include you in our informal support circle and add you to our prayer list.
You can also receive personally directed private prayers, Bible readings and pastoral reflections during this time.  If you wish to have special spiritual requests and needs we welcome them.

The Reverend Neli Miranda Lopez

Priest-in-charge
St. Alban Episcopal Mission
Antigua, Sacatepequez, Guatemala
The Episcopal Church WELCOMES EVERYONE

Sunday, May 3, 2020

The Rev. Neli Miranda Lopez: "Today Jesus comes into our midst; he anoints our head with oil and assures us of his presence while we walk through this pandemic valley."


Fourth Sunday of Easter
The Good Shepherd Sunday.  Psalm 23 & John 10:1-10
Rev. Neli Miranda 

Over the past few weeks, we have lived through times of anxiety, fear, pain and despair because of the Coronavirus threat; however, we have also been surrounded by the loving and permanent presence of God.
During this Easter season, we have been strengthened by following the path of Jesus, which teaches us how to face time of suffering and death and how to transform it into life. Thus, during the last three weeks, we have been receiving good news from the risen Jesus who, in the midst of this pandemic proclaims hope and abundant life to all. 
Today, on this fourth Sunday of Easter, we are blessed with a meaningful celebration, the Good Shepherd Sunday.  This celebration comes to us as a great and providential gift for so far as we know, we continue facing the pandemic threat, and we need to continue strengthening our faith. How we need this now! Thus, today we are encouraged by such inspiring Bible readings like Psalm 23 and John 10 that evokes us the powerful image of the Good Shepherd. 
David the king of Israel wrote the Psalm 23 from his own life experience – as a shepherd and as a sheep. He reminds us that life is a journey full of different experiences and some of them could turn out to be hard experiences; however, those experiences must be lived in the company, guidance and protection of God, the Good Shepherd. 
Thus, David reminds us today, that the Lord our Shepherd walks with us always, even in the valley of the shadow of death, even in the valley of the shadow of this pandemic. So, God, our Shepherd is our caretaker, who watches over us in such a way that we can then rest in green pastures, besides still waters, even when we go through the most troubled waters. Therefore, in the light of this promise we can reaffirm our faith “I shall fear no evil; for you are with me… your guidance and protection, they comfort me”. 
In the New Testament, we find that Jesus embodied the Good Shepherd among the people. He was a shepherd concerned for the wellbeing of sheep. He cared for the most vulnerable, the weak and sick sheep. In the Gospel account we find that during his ministry, crowds came to him looking for help, and “he had compassion for them, because they were harassed and helpless, like sheep without a shepherd” (Matthew 9, 36). 
In today´s Gospel, Jesus proclaims himself as the Good Shepherd in contrast with those who, as thieves and bandits enter the sheepfold to steal, and kill and destroy. In Jesus´ time, the leadership – called to be shepherds of the people – became evil shepherds who took advantage of the people and hurt them instead of healing them; therefore, most of the people lived a very precarious life.  This is why Jesus says, “I came that they may have life, and have it abundantly” (John 10, 10).
Jesus´ commitment as the Good Shepherd led him to the sacrifice. This time, it was not the sheep who were sacrificed but the Good Shepherd who laid down his life for the sheep (John 10, 11).  In this way, the image of the Good Shepherd became a message of trust and comfort for the early Christians. Thus, they reinterpreted psalm 23 in the light of Jesus´ ministry, and the Good Shepherd guided them during the hard times they faced in the first centuries. Paintings of Jesus as the Good Shepherd have been found in some catacombs in Rome; they tell us about the faith of the first Christian generations who were confident in the guidance and protection of Jesus, their Good Shepherd. 
Providentially, this extraordinary Sunday brings among us the loving presence of the Good Shepherd. Today Jesus comes into our midst; he anoints our head with oil and assures us of his presence while we walk through this pandemic valley.  May we hear and recognize his voice as he leads us in right paths! 
Moreover, Jesus the Good Shepherd comes among us today to remind us of the mission we have been called for. Just two weeks ago, the Risen Jesus sent us into the world to bring good news. He called us to be a living and healing presence among people who live troubled, among those who walk around everywhere, like sheep without a shepherd. Therefore, since we are Jesus´s disciples, we too are shepherds in this world. May we be good shepherds as Jesus, our Good Shepherd!
Dear sisters and brothers, today when we go through this dark and pandemic valley, may the Good Shepherd come into our homes, remain with us, and restore our troubled soul. May we hear his divine voice who leads us to green pastures beside still water; may we proclaim together “I fear no evil; for you are with me”. Amen.

Neli+

Neli+ Miranda

Greetings and blessings in the name of our Lord, Jesus Christ
Please, let us know if you have pastoral needs and/or wish personal, online, or telephone communications during this period of Coronavirus isolation.
Email:
The Reverend Neli Miranda Lopez
nelimirandalopez@gmail.com

We will include you in our informal support circle and add you to our prayer list.
You can also receive personally directed private prayers, Bible readings and pastoral reflections during this time.  If you wish to have special spiritual requests and needs we welcome them.

The Reverend Neli Miranda Lopez

Priest-in-charge
St. Alban Episcopal Mission
Antigua, Sacatepequez, Guatemala
The Episcopal Church WELCOMES EVERYONE


Sunday, April 26, 2020

The Risen Jesus: "He accompanies us as we look for answers. He gives meaning to our lives in the midst of pain, suffering and death; he teaches us that all this can be transformed into life." Neli+

Third Sunday Of Easter Clipart | Free Images at Clker.com - vector ...

Third Sunday of Easter
Luke 24: 13-35 
Rev. Neli Miranda 

On the day of Jesus´ resurrection, Cleopas and his companion (most likely his wife) are leaving from Jerusalem. They are Jesus´ disciples who had come to Jerusalem to celebrate Passover with Jesus and his community.

In Jesus’ time, Jewish people celebrated Passover not only remembering the great event of their liberation from Egypt but also hoping for their soon liberation from the Roman Yoke. While Jesus was among the people, he embodied this hope of liberation. Thus, many people expected to see him proclaimed as King and Messiah during this Passover. However, instead of celebrating the proclamation and enthronement of Jesus as a King, they witnessed his brutal death on the cross.

Therefore, these disciples are escaping from a place of pain, suffering, death and fear.  They are heading to Emmaus (warm spring) 7 miles away from the inhospitable Jerusalem. Although they have heard the good news about Jesus´ resurrection, the weight of grief and confusion do not let them understand such great news. Thus, they are beginning a journey of despair hoping that Emmaus (warm spring) will comfort them. 

As they begin their journey, they cannot stop to talk and discuss with each other about all things that had happened. They are looking for reasonable answers to their deep grief and despair.  They walk so self-absorbed that they do not realize that the risen Jesus accompanies them during their journey. Luke says, “Their eyes were kept from recognizing him.” (24:16). It seems that they cannot recognize Jesus for their grief obscure their vision; or, maybe because they are focused on their own reasoning and there is no room for faith. So, Jesus comes near, joins them, and tries to awaken them from their self-absorption by asking, “What are you discussing with each other while you walk along”? (24:17).

When challenged by the unknown companion on the road, they begin to explain their concerns. They speak about their hope in “Jesus of Nazareth, a prophet mighty in deed and word before God and all the people…” They point out: “We had hoped that he was the one to redeem Israel.” (24:19 - 21). So, they had hoped that Jesus was going to sit on a throne as a king, establish an earthly kingdom, begin a war to liberate them from the Roman yoke and take revenge on his enemies. In addition, as Jewish people, they had hoped that in this new kingdom, they were going to become rulers of the nations, and hoped to enjoy some rights and privileges above the rest of peoples. Now – they add – “our chief priests and leaders handed him [Jesus] over to be condemned to death and crucified him.” (24:20).

No wonder these disciples are running away from Jerusalem… They had come to fulfill their hope and now their hope is shattered… So, Jesus gathers up every fragment of their shattered hope and raises a new hope, a new path, and a new world.  “He interpreted to them the things about himself in all the scriptures.” (24:27). Jesus clarifies that the Messiah is not the King Messiah sitting on a throne and dominating others from there – as they expected – but the suffering Messiah who goes through human suffering. So, the Messiah is the One who, in solidarity, joins with the suffering of this world and exposes injustice on earth. Thus, the path of Jesus, The Messiah of God, is a nonviolent plan to redeem the world. In this way, Jesus redefines power and relates it to love, service, solidarity, generosity, sacrifice and self-denial.

At this point, the disciples’ eyes begin to open and their hearts begin to burn, as they wonder about the identity of this stranger and companion on the road. Nevertheless, they will recognize him later, amid a moment of intimacy When he was at the table with them, he took bread, blessed and broke it, and gave it to them. Then their eyes were opened, and they recognized him” (24:30-31).

  After this encounter with Jesus in Emmaus – in warm spring – the disciples decided to return to the inhospitable Jerusalem, where the suffering community remained. There, they were comforted by the gathered community and testified first-hand that they have walked and shared with the risen Jesus.

During this time of Pandemic threat, there are many shattered hopes, there are many people trying to escape from this inhospitable situation. This is not surprising for we are living in the midst of grief, despair, fear, confusion and disappointment; we feel that all hope is gone… Could it be that our hopes were on the wrong side, just like the disciples on the road to Emmaus?

The risen Jesus meets us today on the road to Emmaus, the road of shattered hopes. He accompanies us as we look for answers. He gives meaning to our lives in the midst of pain, suffering and death; he teaches us that all this can be transformed into life. He feeds us and put us back on track. Finally, he sends us back to Jerusalem, to the inhospitable place, where the suffering community remains; for, it is exactly in a place of suffering and pain where we can share the good news of the risen Jesus. Thus, Emmaus (warm spring) is a point of arrival and a point of departure.

As we walk today our own path to Emmaus, may our eyes be opened to see the living presence of Jesus in our midst; and may the risen Jesus feed us with spiritual food and raise a new hope in our lives. 

Amen.

Neli+

Neli+ Miranda

Greetings and blessings in the name of our Lord, Jesus Christ
Please, let us know if you have pastoral needs and/or wish personal, online, or telephone communications during this period of Coronavirus isolation.
Email:
The Reverend Neli Miranda Lopez
nelimirandalopez@gmail.com

We will include you in our informal support circle and add you to our prayer list.
You can also receive personally directed private prayers, Bible readings and pastoral reflections during this time.  If you wish to have special spiritual requests and needs we welcome them.

The Reverend Neli Miranda Lopez

Priest-in-charge
St. Alban Episcopal Mission
Antigua, Sacatepequez, Guatemala
The Episcopal Church WELCOMES EVERYONE