Translate

Friday, February 28, 2014

THE REVEREND RICARDO FROHMADER: ¨Reconciliation means embracing the other, reaching out to the other. It means recognizing in the “other” whom we might initially hate and fear, the image of God in whom that “other” was made, just as we were.¨


HOMILY FOR THE SEVENTH SUNDAY AFTER EPIPHANY, 2014

Dear Lord Jesus when I reflect on your words which have been proclaimed this morning, I am overwhelmed with the sense of my imperfections. I am so far from meeting your demands, from living up to the standards that you are laying out for me that I want to bow my head and cry. “Be perfect, therefore, as your heavenly Father is perfect”. How difficult that seems. Certainly I can never be perfect on my own. I can´t begin to achieve this by myself- help me Lord Jesus! Help me to be less imperfect!

My brothers and sisters in Christ, I hope you are further down the road to living Jesus’ commands to us than I am. How does this morning’s Gospel make you feel? “You have heard that it was said, ‘An eye for an eye, and a tooth for a tooth’. But I say to you, Do not resist an evildoer”. If we do not resist evil and those who do evil, will we not be overrun and enslaved by evil? This question I think is at the core of a tension that exists in our Christian heritage, which is precisely the one of dealing with evil when it strikes us. It also has ramifications when we must consider going to war and doing military service. Some of our Christian traditions are solidly pacifist. Others are not pacifist at all, and we march off to war with our chaplains in tow.

You have heard versions and variations of this story in some parts of Central America and Mexico. You are driving and you are at a stoplight. There is a tap on your window. When you look, a motorcyclist is tapping on your window with the barrel of a gun, to get your attention. You do not have a bulletproof car. The person tapping asks for your phone, your wallet, your purse, your laptop. Hopefully you look in your rear-view mirror, and you see that there is another motorcycle behind you. Resist the urge to try to run over your assailant with your car-he is operating in tandem with someone on another motorcycle, and resistance is likely to earn you a bullet in the brain. Give the person whatever he is asking for. No phone, purse, wallet or automobile is worth your life. Here is a clear-cut example of a situation in which you or I are better off not resisting evil. I pray that I will have the sense to not resist, if my turn comes.

If you read the newspapers in this region, almost every day there is a story about someone shot dead on a street for refusing to give up their cellphone. Or there will be a story about several persons killed and wounded on a bus, because someone resisted a hold-up, pulled out a gun, and began shooting. Sometimes one or more of the bad guys are hit, but frequently there is an exchange of gunfire in which innocent bystanders and passengers are wounded or killed. Maybe the person who resisted is among those hurt or killed as well. Again, if you are travelling on a bus, what can you be carrying that is worth your life? In situations like these Jesus’ words make good sense.

Nonetheless there are events or occurrences in history where not resisting evil, where turning the other cheek can lead to massive numbers of deaths. I am thinking of the Shoah, or holocaust, of course, but also of the Khmer Rouge exterminating anyone literate in Cambodia, and the Bahutu extermination of the Batutsi among them in Rwanda. In the end these situations ended only because there were military actions, often tragically late, which finally put an end to these evils and to the ongoing slaughter of innocents. The rebellion of the Jews in the Warsaw ghetto in 1944 against their Nazi exterminators did not save their lives. But in retrospect it allowed Jews to feel that not everywhere did they go quietly to their slaughter. But what is the value of feeling that?

Look at what else Jesus is asking of us: “Give to everyone who begs from you, and do not refuse anyone who wants to borrow from you.” If we apply these two injunctions literally, there might be a flurry of activity as beggars discover that we will give to all of them. When people realize that we will refuse no loan, how long will it be before we are as poor as the people who came begging and asking to borrow from us? In Jesus’ Kingdom this is how we are meant to be and live.

We can respond to Jesus’ commands on two levels, I think. There are those who do give up their possessions and divest themselves of their goods and belongings. We have the example of Saint Francis of Assisi and other saints who renounced position, privilege, family, wealth and comfort and voluntarily became poor to follow our Lord Jesus. On another level, many of us lead our lives in a sometimes tangled skein of relationships with others, many of whom we love, (and some whom we might not, but we feel duty-bound) for whom we need to care. They may be children, a spouse or aged parents. They may be friends or partners or lovers. To care for those who are part of our network of relationships we administer our belongings, our wealth if you will, in a prudent and judicious way so as to be able to meet the needs of those who are part of our circle of love and responsibility. For those of us who cannot fully respond to Jesus’ challenge, Jesus is goading us to open up, to widen the circle of community, to do more, to be more open to others and their needs.

“You have heard that it was said ‘You shall love your neighbor and hate your enemy.’ But I say to you, Love your enemies and pray for those who persecute you, so that you may be children of your Father in heaven; for he makes his sun rise on the evil and on the good, and sends rain on the righteous and the unrighteous. For if you love those who love you, what reward do you have? Do not even the tax collectors do the same? And if you greet only your brothers and sisters, what more are you doing than others?  Do not even the Gentiles do the same?” Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby touched on something very important in his sermon in August of 2013 at Saint James Cathedral in Guatemala City. In this world of strife and warfare, Christians need to bear witness to reconciliation. Reconciliation is what Jesus did for us when he died on the cross. He reconciled us to God.

“So he says live it out. Overflow with the reconciliation we have received from God, who changes our relationship to Him and to each other, who enables us to be different. He says, “Be the teachers of my way, and my way is peace and justice and love, not violence, bitterness and conflict.” The gift of the church to the world is reconciliation. We have been given it as a gift for ourselves so that we may know God, and we have been given it to learn.”

Reconciliation means embracing the other, reaching out to the other. It means recognizing in the “other” whom we might initially hate and fear, the image of God in whom that “other” was made, just as we were. If we learn to do this we will be walking with Jesus. We will have started down the road Jesus is pointing us to, becoming “children of our Father in heaven”. Is this easy? I think not.  We must ask God again and again, and not just as in today’s collect, to send His Holy Spirit, and pour into our hearts his greatest gift, which is love. Without love we are accounted dead before Him. And we must pray for those who hate us, and those whom we ourselves fear. Please visit Page 816 in your Book of Common Prayer, and let us together pray God for our enemies:

“O God the father of all, whose Son commanded us to love our enemies: Lead them and us from prejudice to truth; deliver them and us from hatred, cruelty and revenge; and in your good time enable us all to stand reconciled before you; through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen”
Ricardo+

Thanks to Mad Priest for photo



St. Alban English Mission, Antigua, Guatemala is a outreach project of The St. James English parish, Episcopal Diocese of Guatemala, IARCA

The Most Reverend Armando Guerra Soria, Rector and Primate

The Reverend Ricardo Frohmader, Associate Minister
St Alban Mission holds services every Sunday at Noon
Casa Convento Concepcion, Antigua Guatemala
All are welcome - See welcome letter at the sidebar

Thursday, February 27, 2014

NEWS FROM AROUND THE ANGLICAN COMMUNION: Milwaukee Episcopal priests rock the house with a religious message



¨They call themselves the Rectors of Rock. The Fathers of Funk. The Collar Studs.
It's all cheeky fun, but believe it or not, these four Episcopal priests live up to the billing.
Fathers Drew Bunting, Andrew Jones, David Simmons and Don Fleischman are the fab four of Monstrance, a rock, blues and country band more interested in fun than fame, whose members lend their considerable talents to worthy causes throughout the Milwaukee diocese.
"We're not in this to make money. We know we're never going on tour," said Bunting, priest-in-charge at St. James Episcopal Church in Milwaukee, who sings lead vocals and plays bass in the band. "We just want to have a good time. We know we have these gifts, and we want to use them in service of the greater good."
Monstrance will take top billing — OK, the only billing — on the Red Door Tour when they rock St. Christopher's Episcopal Church in River Hills on Friday. Proceeds from the event will benefit the Red Door Clothes ministries at St. James & Trinity Episcopal churches in Milwaukee and Wauwatosa, and the Hospitality Center at St. Luke's in Racine.
The good fathers fired up the amps under the stained glass windows of Simmons' home church — St. Matthias in Waukesha — for band practice Friday. There, they ripped through covers of Cheap Trick, Tom Petty, Bob Dylan and the Ramones, not to mention an ecclesiastic parody of the J. Geils Band's "Centerfold...enjoy, read it all thanks to the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel..."

http://www.jsonline.com/news/religion/milwaukee-episcopal-priests-rock-the-house-with-a-religious-message-b99210770z1-247195451.html#ixzz2uXeQmvbd 
Follow us: @JournalSentinel on Twitter


Thanks to Episcopal Cafe, sidebar
Thanks to The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel



St. Alban English Mission, Antigua, Guatemala is a outreach project of The St. James English parish, Episcopal Diocese of Guatemala, IARCA

The Most Reverend Armando Guerra Soria, Rector and Primate

The Reverend Ricardo Frohmader, Associate Minister
St Alban Mission holds services every Sunday at Noon
Casa Convento Concepcion, Antigua Guatemala
All are welcome - See welcome letter at the sidebar

Monday, February 24, 2014

FATHER MATTHEW: The Book of Common Prayer in 4 Minutes







St. Alban English Mission, Antigua, Guatemala is a outreach project of The St. James English parish, Episcopal Diocese of Guatemala, IARCA

The Most Reverend Armando Guerra Soria, Rector and Primate

The Reverend Ricardo Frohmader, Associate Minister
St Alban Mission holds services every Sunday at Noon
Casa Convento Concepcion, Antigua Guatemala
All are welcome - See welcome letter at the sidebar

FIRST ANNIVERSARY ST. ALBAN MISSION: Sunday, March 2, 2014, Casa Convento Concepcion


Dear Saint Alban Family and Friends:

We met during the Eucharist today to discuss our planned first anniversary celebration of the Saint Alban Mission.

Several persons who had shown enthusiasm for a party last Sunday were not there today.

We  also learned that next Sunday coincides with the picnic at  El Zapote cinchona farm to benefit the Museo Ixchel, which is a marvelous and fun event, and several of our members showed an inclination to go that.

The Bishop cannot make it to our celebration either as he will be in Mazatenango next weekend.

We will give thanks to God next Sunday for blessing your work at Saint Alban, but our celebration will be put off to another date. Elizabeth Bell will provide an anniversary cake. Fr. Ricardo is good for a vegan friendly (Crisco) rhubarb pie. No other food is called for since we are not holding the planned potluck luncheon.

Wednesday March 05 is Ash Wednesday. There will be an Ash Wednesday Eucharist with imposition of ashes at 9:30 a.m. at Casa Convento Concepción. There will be another service on Wednesday at 12:00 Noon at Saint James in Guatemala City. You are all welcome at these services.

Wishing you a joyful week I am yours
in Christ
Fr. Ricardo


St. Alban English Mission, Antigua, Guatemala is a outreach project of The St. James English parish, Episcopal Diocese of Guatemala, IARCA

The Most Reverend Armando Guerra Soria, Rector and Primate

The Reverend Ricardo Frohmader, Associate Minister
St Alban Mission holds services every Sunday at Noon
Casa Convento Concepcion, Antigua Guatemala
All are welcome - See welcome letter at the sidebar

Tuesday, February 18, 2014

The Reverend Ricardo Frohmader: A HOMILY FOR THE 6TH SUNDAY AFTER EPIPHANY; 2014


 ¨Friday was Saint Valentine’s Day. It is an occasion for the supermarkets and stores to sell us chocolates and candies as tokens of our love for someone. In the United States it is the biggest floral holiday of the year. More flowers are sold for Valentine’s Day than for any other occasion of the year. Roses are of course the favored flowers bought and sold that day. In Guatemala, it is el “día del cariño, y de la amistad”, or the day of affection and friendship. That perhaps broadens the coverage and scope of the day, and perhaps de-emphasizes the romantic love that is the center of the day’s celebration in America. It is an occasion to celebrate romantic love, or perhaps sentimental love, which may or may not be a part of true love.

Saint Valentine is a poorly documented legendary figure from second or third century Rome. He was a Bishop or a priest at a time when young men were forbidden to marry if they had not done their military service. You need to understand that military service was not a three year hitch. A soldier served until the age of forty, was then often rewarded with a grant of land, and was free to marry and start a family.  Of course the soldier had to survive first.

In legend a couple of young lovers came to Valentine and asked him to marry them. He did so, in contravention of the law at the time. For this he was martyred. We do not know what became of the couple he married. We also know that the day appointed for remembering him was February 14, the day of a pagan Roman festival called the Lupercalia, which was traditionally associated with fertility rituals and courtship between young men and women. Early Christians co-opted the pagan festival, making it into the celebration of the romantic love of two young persons, and the martyrdom of a priest who married them in defiance of Roman law.

Saint Valentine’s Day was celebrated on Friday. Two days later we proclaim a Gospel which comes to us in the context of Jesus’ teachings on the mount. We interpret this Gospel as being an intensive seminar by Jesus for preparing his disciples for the kingdom. The rules of Jesus’ time are revised, and made more stringent and demanding. If the Law punishes murder, under the new rules anger will bring judgment on the angry person. If you have a quarrel, go and settle it with the other person quickly. The Ten Commandments forbid adultery-Jesus says that anyone looking at a woman with lust has already committed adultery. Nowadays we would have to broaden that definition to include women looking at men. In an interview with Playboy magazine before his election President Jimmy Carter famously confessed to having committed this sin in his heart by gazing on attractive women. He did get elected, confession notwithstanding. I know several women who find cyclists in racing gear wonderful to contemplate. I like to admire a fine feminine figure. I guess I am an ocular adulterer, although the line between where contemplation and lust begins is pretty much undefined. And besides I am over seventy.

Jesus then goes on to tell us to pluck out our right eye, or cut off our right hand if it causes us to sin-it’s better to be one-eyed and left-handed, than to burn in hell. At this point it becomes obvious that Jesus is using hyperbole to drive his point home. Really, no one is expected to mutilate himself for the kingdom’s sake. But in this ferocious context he goes on to further revise the Mosaic code. “It was also said, ‘Whoever divorces his wife, let him give her a certificate of divorce’. But I say to you that anyone who divorces his wife, except on the grounds of unchastity, causes her to commit adultery; and whoever marries a divorced woman commits adultery”.

Jesus returns to this subject in Matthew 19:1-12, in Mark 10:11-12, and in Luke 16:18. He is adamant in insisting that marriage should be indissoluble. What is the theological basis for Jesus’ revision of the Laws of Moses? It lies in the book of Genesis, chapter 2:24: “Therefore a man leaves his father and his mother and clings to his wife, and they become one flesh”. In Jesus’ view marriage is a covenant relationship in which two beings voluntarily assume obligations before one another, with God as their witness. The covenant is not between the couple and God, but has God as witness and sanctifier, if you will, of the relationship. The relationship is based on the couple leaving their family and cleaving to one another. This is the basis of the covenant. Now if one of the parties violates the covenant either through sexual immorality with another, or by abandoning the partner, the covenant has been broken, and ceases to be valid. There is no marriage.

Now the passages I have pointed out to you also include Jesus’ prohibition of remarriage. Why? I submit that this is in same vein as the injunction to pluck out your eye and cut off your hand. It is an exaggeration meant to drive home a point, which is that marriage is meant to be forever. It is aimed at the disciples and not at the general public where Jesus’ message has not yet reached. Are there special circumstances in the context of Jesus’ time that make him take that position?

I will argue that Jesus was concerned for the welfare of the women of Israel. Note that it is the men doing the divorcing in Jesus’ talk, and not the women. There was in Jesus’ time a school of rabbinical thought led by Rabbi Hillel, which held that a husband could divorce his wife for very small reasons. If she burnt a meal, for example, her husband could divorce her. Hillel was a leader of the Pharisees in Jerusalem when Jesus was a child. Hillel’s thinking continued to permeate the thought of the Pharisees in Jesus’ time. In Jewish society women were powerless. A certificate of divorce might allow the more fortunate to seek another marriage, but for most women the prospects were very grim.

Girls lived with their parents until the onset on menstruation. At that point they were eligible for marriage. Since women did no work outside the home, nor earned wages, a family generally sought to negotiate a marriage contract for their daughters with someone suitable as soon as possible. The vast majority of girls did not know how to read or write. They were illiterate. Depending on the family’s means, a dowry was provided, so that a woman did not come empty handed to her marriage, but in many cases the family was too poor to provide anything but a token dowry. Girls would be 12-14 when they were betrothed, that is promised to someone, and 13 to 15 when they married. Childbearing began shortly thereafter.

Once married, a girl usually moved in to her husband’s family’s quarters, where she would be under the authority of her husband and her female in-laws. She would become another laborer in the household, spinning, weaving, milking, making cheese, cooking, cleaning and taking care of the small animals. Hopefully she would bear male children, and her husband would appreciate her for that. But if she was barren, or produced daughters only, a husband might want to take a different wife. Burning dinner was grounds for divorce. Children remained with the father. Alimony was unheard of.

A divorced woman, if she had only a modest dowry which technically should be returned to her, was often left destitute. If her parents were still living, they might take her back if she had a certificate of divorce, but her prospects were dim. She was second hand merchandise, rejected goods. Who would want her? If her parents were no longer living, she was on her own. What could an illiterate abandoned woman do to survive? Prostitution or begging were the alternatives open to her.

I think the social context in which Jesus spoke against divorce can be understood in the light of the lack of respect for the marriage covenant that was rampant in his time. That the leading Pharisee sages were proponents of easy divorce for men and showed utter disregard for women did not endear them to Jesus. Jesus speaks up against divorce because he sees the damage it does to the weak and poor. This compassion and concern for the weak and poor is characteristic of Jesus’ ministry. We have seen that he worked easily and comfortably with women on a plane of equality. Mary of Magdala was one of his closest disciples. Martha and Mary of Bethany are two other disciples. Jesus teaches Mary as he would any other male disciple.

We need to remember that Jesus in his parables addresses them to men and to women. The birds of the air need no granaries Jesus tells men. The lilies of the field do not need to spin, weave or sew. If the prodigal son comes home to his father who celebrates his return, the woman who has lost her silver coin rejoices when she finds it. He reaches out to men and women equally. He likens God to the father of a prodigal son. He likens God to a woman who seeks her lost coin. When a woman taken in adultery is brought before Jesus and he is asked whether she should be stoned to death, he challenges the person without sin to cast the first stone. When no one does and the crowd leaves, he asks the woman whether her accusers condemned her. “No” she says. “Neither do I” says Jesus to her. “Go and sin no more”. Mercy and compassion are the main characteristics of Jesus’ relationships with men and women.

If we look at marriage as a covenant between two people in which they pledge to lead their lives together and to enter into a relationship of sexual exclusivity in which they are one flesh we can see where that covenant often can be damaged beyond repair. Abandonment violates one half of the covenant. Sexual immorality is the other aspect that annuls the covenant. The party abandoned or the party betrayed cannot be asked to renounce the hope of entering into another, lasting, God blessed covenant. Still some churches continue to rigidly oppose not only divorce but remarriage. The penalties for remarriage are especially burdensome and unjust to the party which was wronged. The sacraments will be denied to her or him.

“Marry in haste, repent at leisure” says the old adage. I think notions of romantic love, of sentimental love leave people unprepared for the hard job of loving someone for better or for worse. Perhaps we have high expectations, or perhaps we have unreasonable expectations. Over half of all marriages today end in divorce. How are we to reconcile what our Lord says in the Gospels with what happens to over half of us in the course of our lives? If our partner breaks the marriage covenant we entered into, should we be condemned to remain celibate ever after?

The Episcopal Church holds that marriage should be forever. We recognize however that it often is not. In a situation where a divorce takes place we refrain from judgment and condemnation. God knows what is in human heart better than we do. There will be no excommunication. If we are to be consistent with the mercy and compassion that Jesus would have us exercise, then denying the sacraments to a divorced and remarried person is effectively to deprive them of the means of grace whereby they can repair their relationship with God. Do you think God wants us to do this?

In the Episcopal Church of Guatemala divorced persons can be married. However the Bishop must be informed and briefed on the particulars, because it is an exceptional situation. The canons call for special attention being paid to the care and support being given to the ex-wife and children of the previous marriage. If the former husband is meeting his moral responsibilities to his former spouse and children then the marriage can normally proceed. We believe that with God’s grace a person can put a failed marriage behind them, and that, a new and more mature covenant can replace the one which foundered. This does not change our belief that “marriage is not to be entered into unadvisedly or lightly, but reverently, deliberately and in accordance for the purposes for which it was instituted by God” (B.C.P. p.423). I leave you with these thoughts. May your relationships be blessed by the grace of God. Amen.  Ricardo+


St. Alban English Mission, Antigua, Guatemala is a outreach project of The St. James English parish, Episcopal Diocese of Guatemala, IARCA

The Most Reverend Armando Guerra Soria, Rector and Primate

The Reverend Ricardo Frohmader, Associate Minister
St Alban Mission holds services every Sunday at Noon
Casa Convento Concepcion, Antigua Guatemala
All are welcome - See welcome letter at the sidebar

Monday, February 17, 2014

The Reverend Ricardo Frohmader: HOMILY FOR THE FIFTH SUNDAY AFTER EPIPHANY, 2014


¨Are you salty? Am I salty? We need to be salty says Jesus. Why, what is there about salt that is so desirable that we are told to be the salt of the earth? Don’t our doctors put us on low salt diets, because there is too much salt in our diet, and this excess of salt contributes to hypertension and cardiovascular disease? Does Jesus want us to keel over dead from being salty? What is he driving at, anyway?
Have you ever tried to eat food without salt? Are you on a salt free diet, or have you ever tried one? I have, and I can tell you I went back to salting my food as soon as I was beyond the reach of the kindly dieticians who removed it from my daily diet. Even the poorest diet of tortillas and salt, or “tortilla con sal”, requires it. Do you regularly reach for the salt-shaker? I confess that I do. Why? Well, because salt gives a wonderful flavor to the other flavors of the food. And despite the bad press it has today, it is indispensable to human life. We need salt. Our modern day problem is that technology has made salt extremely abundant and extremely cheap and so it has found its way into most of our food, in amounts that are excessive. Food processors use it because it enhances the flavor of their offerings. Still and all it is necessary to maintaining human life. Curious fact: vegetarians need much more salt than meat and dairy eaters. Why? Because animals themselves need salt to stay alive, and this salt permeates the tissue or milk products we consume. It is lacking however in grains and other foods of vegetable origin.
So if Jesus’ followers which include you and me are the salt of the earth what does that mean for us? It means we are called upon to have the same effect that salt has on an otherwise bland dish. We are to give the life around us character by our witness to the truth that is in Jesus. If we do not impart salt but rather become bland ourselves we are no longer good for anything. If we lose our saltiness we are worthless, says Jesus. So we are called upon to be the flavoring if you wish in the world around us.
Jesus then launches a second metaphor for us his followers-we are the light of the world. If the master of the house has lit a lamp, he does not put it under a bushel basket. We are meant to give light to the entire house. I read that as an injunction to act as light in the community in which we live and witness our faith. In so doing others will give glory to God in heaven for what we do. We are meant to be sources of light to others.
How might that tie in with the Old Testament Lesson we have heard this morning? Jesus in this morning’s Gospel tells his listeners that their righteousness must exceed that of the scribes and Pharisees. As you know, these groups in Jesus’ time were known for very strict adherence to the external aspects of the law, but what about their hearts? Listen again to what Isaiah has to say about this ritualistic behavior: “Such fasting as you do today will not make your voice heard on high. Is such the fast that I choose, a day to humble oneself? Is it to bow down the head like a bulrush, and to lie in sackcloth and ashes? Will you call this a fast, a day acceptable to the Lord? Is this not the fast that I choose: to loose the bonds of injustice, to undo the thongs of the yoke, to let the oppressed go free, and to break every yoke? Is it not to share your bread with the hungry and bring the homeless poor into your house; when you see the naked to cover them, and not to hide yourself from your own kin? Then your light shall break forth like the dawn, and your healing shall spring up quickly; your vindicator shall go before you, the glory of the Lord shall be your rear guard. Then you shall call and the Lord will answer; you shall cry for help, and he will say, Here I am.”
Righteousness does not consist of kneeling, genuflecting, or fasting. The ceremonies and the external rituals of faith are secondary to the Lord. “I desire mercy, not sacrifice” says the Lord. The content of our obedience to the Lord is important, and it does not consist primarily of faithful attendance at ceremonies or observance of rituals. The righteous person will struggle against injustice, will help the oppressed become free, will undo the knots of the yoke under which the poor labor. The righteous man and woman will seek to clothe the naked, to shelter the homeless, to support members of the family when they come looking for help. In other words, righteousness requires engagement with the inequality and injustice that surrounds us.
We are called to be an active force in the community around us. In so doing, even though we are a minority we can be like a pinch of salt and transform the reality around us, defining and sharpening its flavor. Likewise we are lamps lit to illuminate the entire community. When Jesus asks us to let our light shine, it is not for our glory, but to provide light for others. If we do this, then it shall be counted to the glory of God, not ours. And this is as it should be.
I believe that if we take the Prophets and Jesus seriously we will not be content with the state of things as they are in this world. Jesus when he call us to be salty and to be as lanterns is calling on us to be transformational like salt is, and to reach out to those around us, to illuminate them, to inspire in them the love of God, and to do what is pleasing to God. “Light shines in the darkness for the upright; the righteous are merciful and full of compassion” says the Psalmist in today’s psalm. This is, I submit the type of righteousness that Jesus is demanding of us-not that we pay attention to externalities like the scribes and Pharisees, but that we practice mercy and compassion. This is what is pleasing to God. This is the offering that is pleasing to him. Let us in silence ask God to guide us in the pathways of mercy and compassion.¨ Ricardo+
Amen


St. Alban English Mission, Antigua, Guatemala is a outreach project of The St. James English parish, Episcopal Diocese of Guatemala, IARCA

The Most Reverend Armando Guerra Soria, Rector and Primate

The Reverend Ricardo Frohmader, Associate Minister
St Alban Mission holds services every Sunday at Noon
Casa Convento Concepcion, Antigua Guatemala
All are welcome - See welcome letter at the sidebar

A MESSAGE FROM THE MOST REVEREND ARMANDO GUERRA: ¨....rebuilding the Temple of Seja, Izabal, Guatemala




¨La reunion de la Iglesia en construcciones de madera, cemento, piedra o el material que se encuentre a la mano siempre ha sido una necesidad vital para el Pueblo de Dios, recordemos a David iniciando la construccion de la Casa de Dios. Asi para los miembros de nuestra Iglesia es de gran significado el poder construir y contar con un templo. Agradecemos a la Ofrenda Unida de Gracias (UTO) porque siempre ha respondido a esta necesidad, tambien agradecemos a grupos comprometidos de la Iglesia como ha sido el caso de la Congregación del Padre Martir Vasquez de la Diocesis de Arizona y miembros de nuestras congregaciones locales que han ayudado a reconstruir el templo de Seja, Izabal. Cabe destacar el esfuerzo que estan haciendo nuestros hermanos Quiches de Chuguexa II, que con recursos propios estan tratando de agrandar el Templo del Señor, tienen dificultades economicas pero lo estan intentando. Me han dicho que cualquier ayuda es bienvenida.

The meeting of the Church in constructions of wood, cement, stone or material that will always be at hand has been a vital necessity for the people of God, remember David starting the construction of the House of God. So for the members of our Church is significant power build and having a temple. We are grateful to the United offering of thanks (UTO) because it has always responded to this need, also thanks to committed groups of the Church as it has been the case of the Congregation of the father Martir Vasquez of the Diocese of Arizona and members of our local congregations that have helped rebuild the Temple of Seja, Izabal. Notably the effort they are making our brothers Chuguexa II Quiches, having economic difficulties with own resources are trying to enlarge the Temple of the Lord, but are trying to. They have told me that any help is welcome.¨ (Translated by Bing)




St. Alban English Mission, Antigua, Guatemala is a outreach project of The St. James English parish, Episcopal Diocese of Guatemala, IARCA

The Most Reverend Armando Guerra Soria, Rector and Primate

The Reverend Ricardo Frohmader, Associate Minister
St Alban Mission holds services every Sunday at Noon
Casa Convento Concepcion, Antigua Guatemala
All are welcome - See welcome letter at the sidebar
g)

Saturday, February 8, 2014

ANGLICAN COMMUNION NEWS: Archbishop congratulates Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori, the Presiding Bishop of the Episcopal Church, on honorary Oxford degree

Presiding Bishop, Katherine Jefferts Schori, Primate, The Episcopal Church
¨Archbishop Justin has welcomed news that the Presiding Bishop of the Episcopal Church, Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori, is to be awarded an honorary Doctor of Divinity by the University of Oxford.
He said: “I am delighted by the news that the Most Revd Dr Katharine Jefferts Schori is to receive an honorary Doctor of Divinity from the University of Oxford. This award, richly deserved, reaffirms Bishop Katherine’s remarkable gifts of intellect and compassion, which she has dedicated to the service of Christ. Prior to becoming ordained, Bishop Katherine pursued a career in oceanography, and her enduring deep commitment to the environment has evolved into a profound dedication to stewardship of our planet and humankind, especially in relieving poverty and extending the love and hospitality of Christ to those on the edges of society. As Archbishop Desmond Tutu once said of Bishop Katherine, "In her version of reality, everything is sacred except sin." It must be noted, too, that Bishop Katherine’s achievements serve – and will continue to serve – as a powerful model for women seeking to pursue their vocations in the church.”  Justin Welby, The Archbishop of Canterbury
Thanks to The Anglican News Service, sidebar
Thanks to The Episcopal Church, Photo credit


St. Alban English Mission, Antigua, Guatemala is a outreach project of The St. James English parish, Episcopal Diocese of Guatemala, IARCA

The Most Reverend Armando Guerra Soria, Rector and Primate

The Reverend Ricardo Frohmader, Associate Minister
St Alban Mission holds services every Sunday at Noon
Casa Convento Concepcion, Antigua Guatemala
All are welcome - See welcome letter at the sidebar