Translate

Monday, March 31, 2014

PEOPLE'S PRAYERS: Prayer for the surgery of Fr. Ricardo Frohmader

Holy God of all that is Healing and Healthy, 
we ask Your special grace upon Your Faithful Servant, Fr. Ricardo Frohmader of the Mission of St. Alban's in the Diocese of Guatemala. Comfort him in Your sacred embrace as he undergoes back surgery on April 1. Grant the surgeon clear sight, steady, and blessed hands. Fill the nurses and the operating room with the restorative energy of the Holy Spirit. Enfold Ricardo's spouse Mari and their children with Your soothing and hopeful Presence. Gather the prayers of parishioners and friends from close by and from far and wide as a protective canopy of love. Grant that the curative compassion of our Lord Jesus Christ will speed Ricardo's recovery and we will soon again be the benefactors of his ministry among us.   


Oramos para que en el nombre de Jesucristo para una recuperación rápida.Amen.   

Thanks to Peoples Prayers, sidebar

Thanks to Christiana Brennan Lee


The eight-nine hour surgery will commence at 5:30 A.M.. April 1, 2014

Hospital Herrera Llerandi

Guatemala City, Guatemala, Central America


Sunday, March 30, 2014

FATHER RICARDO FROHMADER: ¨The themes from today’s scripture readings involve light and darkness, blindness and seeing, human ways of seeing, and God’s way of seeing¨


HOMILY FOR THE FOURTH SUNDAY IN LENT 2014
1 Samuel 16: 1-13 - Ephesians 5:8-14 - John 9:1-41- Psalm 23
The themes from today’s scripture readings involve light and darkness, blindness and seeing, human ways of seeing, and God’s way of seeing. Like the Pharisees of today’s Gospel, we may assume that we see when indeed we are blind. We may not be blind in the ophthalmological sense of the word- we see objects, people, light and shadow, but we do not see in a spiritual sense. We may be blind to spiritual realities in the world around us. This is not how we should be- we are meant to see, with the eyes of faith, with the sightedness that comes from grace. We are meant to be light in a world that is often dark.
The themes of seeing as a human and seeing as God sees first comes up in our Old Testament reading for today. The Prophet Samuel has been sent by God to Bethlehem, to Jesse, because God has chosen one of Jesse’s sons to be king of Israel, in place of Saul, and Samuel is to anoint him. That’s all Samuel is told- he is not told which one he is to anoint. Samuel has Jesse bring his sons before him. When he sees Eliab, Samuel thinks: “Surely the Lord’s anointed is now before the Lord”. Eliab is apparently tall and good-looking, but God says “Do not look on his appearance or on the height of his stature, because I have rejected him; for the Lord does not see as mortals see; they look on the outward appearance, but the Lord looks on the heart”. Seven sons pass before Jesse and none is God’s choice. Finally the youngest is called in from tending the sheep. This is David. “The lord said ‘Rise and anoint him; for this is the one’. Then Samuel took the horn of oil, and anointed him in the presence of his brothers; and the spirit of the Lord came mightily upon David from that day forward”.
Anointing with oil is the outward and visible sign of the inward and spiritual grace that comes upon David-“the spirit of the Lord came mightily upon David from that day forward” From that time on God spoke to David, and David to God. He passed from not seeing to seeing. The peace and tranquility that seeing beyond superficial realities brings is expressed in David’s greatest psalm, Psalm 23, which we also read this morning. Seeing brings faith and confidence in the Lord: “I shall not be in want”. That in turns brings a feeling of deep inward peace and trust in the loving kindness of God. “Surely your goodness and mercy shall follow me all the days of my life, and I will dwell in the house of the Lord forever”. When we have received the anointing of God’s grace we can also feel the abundance of God’s goodness and mercy towards us- our cup overflows.
The anointing with God’s grace is of course the core of the sequence hymn, number 671, Amazing Grace, which we sang before and after the Gospel reading today. John Henry Newton who wrote this hymn began his life as an adventurer and officer on slave vessels carrying captured humans in chains from Africa to the plantations of the New World. In his early twenties he was captain of slaving vessels carrying Africans from the shores of the continent to the West Indies for sale. During this time he underwent several progressively more complete conversion experiences.
Was Newton born again in the Evangelical sense of the word? He claimed to have experienced conversion on May 10, 1748, and always marked the anniversary, but later acknowledged that real conversion took place in 1749 during a voyage to Africa where he became ill with fever and asked God to take command of his life. He returned to England in 1750 and continued his activities as a slaver. Between 1750 and 1754 he was captain of three slave vessels. Only a stroke in 1754 put an end to his active involvement in the slave trade, but he continued investing his money in a trading firm that was involved in the slave trade.
Rather than see Newton as an Evangelical transformed from sinner into saint virtually overnight, I see him with Anglican eyes as someone who sought and received God’s grace, but whose spiritual growth took place over a period of many years. That he grew in grace appears to me to be indisputable. He was ordained in 1764 as an Anglican priest. The hymn Amazing Grace dates from around 1779. His public condemnation of the slave trade took place in 1788, some 34 years after his last voyage as captain of a slave ship. The pamphlet Thoughts upon the Slave Trade was sent to every Member of Parliament. It was such a success that it went through several printings. It made a strong case for stopping the trade in slaves. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Newton.
Newton also played an important role in convincing William Wilberforce, a young Minister of Parliament who had a conversion experience in 1785, to continue in politics. Wilberforce as a young man was pleasure seeking and loved gambling. After his conversion experience, fearing public ridicule, he considered retiring from politics. He consulted John Newton, and Newton convinced him to continue in Parliament and to work for the abolition of the slave trade. He did so; his efforts culminated in 1807 with the abolition of the slave trade. This took place in the last days of Newton’s life. Wilberforce went on from there to become a leading advocate for the abolition of slavery. Despite retiring from Parliament in 1826, due to ill health, he also lived to see the abolition of slavery in Great Britain and its colonies in 1833, just before his death.http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Wilberforce
Whatever may be said about John Newton, and William Wilberforce’s moral weakness or inconsistency in their early careers, it is clear to me that they lived as children of light. Each of them, with God’s grace, came to see clearly the evil inherent in the slave trade and in slavery itself. Each of them contributed strongly to making the public aware of the evils inherent in slavery and slave trafficking. Both were instrumental in putting an end to this enormous moral wrong. Both of them rose from the death of moral blindness to the light of Christ. And Newton left us an enduring legacy in the hymn we know as “Amazing Grace”.
Blindness is also the theme of today’s proclamation of the Gospel according to Saint John. Jesus heals a man blind from birth, and this healing takes us through the various types of seeing as well as various types of blindness. There is first of all the physical fact of a blind man receiving his sight. Jesus’ disciples ask if the man or his parents sinned. This is a silly question, since the man has been blind from birth. What sin could he have committed? Since Ezequiel’s writings we know that the sins of the fathers are not visited on the children. “If you were blind”, Jesus tells the Pharisees, “you would not have sin” The man has not sinned because he has been blind all his life. Then Jesus tells the disciples “night is coming, when no one can work. As long as I am in the world, I am the light of the world”. Jesus is light, and now we, his followers are too. The Letter to the Ephesians says to us “in the Lord you are light”.
Next in today’s Gospel we have the people who know the blind beggar. They cannot agree if it is him or not. He keeps insisting that he is the former blind man. “I am he”, he says. It is the Sabbath. He has been healed on the Sabbath, a day when all work is forbidden. A group of concerned citizens bring him to the Pharisees. Here he repeats his testimony before the religious authorities of the land. Pharisee reactions are mixed: “This man is not from God, for he does not observe the Sabbath” say some- for them observing the injunction to abstain from work on the Sabbath is more important than healing the blind. Who are the blind ones here? Others said “How can a man who is a sinner perform such signs?” That’s a good question. As for the man who now sees, he declares of Jesus “He is a prophet”.
The Pharisees refuse to believe the evidence before them. They call for the man’s parents, who testify that their son was born blind but now has received his sight. The parents are afraid to say more, for fear of being expelled from the synagogue. Again the man who now sees is called before them. He is asked to agree with them that Jesus is a sinner. He professes agnosticism on this issue except for one thing: “though I was blind, now I see”. The Pharisees accuse him of being a disciple of Jesus’, whereas they are disciples of Moses. “We know God has spoken to Moses, but as for this man we do not know where he comes from”.
At this point in the narration the man who received his sight begins to make affirmations regarding Jesus: “Never since the world began has it been heard that anyone opened the eyes of a person born blind. If this man were not from God, he could do nothing”. Let us say that he is now seeing not only physically but also spiritually. The questioning and the doubt of the Pharisees have opened his eyes in another way, a spiritual way. His affirmation that Jesus must be from God gets him thrown out.
Jesus hears about this, and goes in search of the man he healed. He asks him if he believes in the Son of Man. “And who is he, sir?” Jesus reveals himself to the man born blind: “You have seen him, and the one speaking with you is he”. The man says “‘Lord, I believe.’ And he worshipped him”. At this moment the progression from physical blindness to sightedness is complete. The man has gone from being blind to seeing. From seeing the man born blind has come to the affirmation that Jesus is a prophet. This leads, under questioning to the affirmation by the blind man that not only is Jesus a prophet, but his works show that he is from God. In the final encounter Jesus reveals himself as the Son of Man, and the man worships him. His voyage of faith is complete.
How about your and my voyage of faith? Is it complete? Do we readily acknowledge Jesus as heaven sent, as our Lord and savior? Or do we still doubt. Do you and I still have blind spots? Are there things we do not see? Do we actively seek to be light in this world? I think that if we are to affirm that Jesus is Lord we will actively seek to be light in this world. Let me remind you of Saint Paul’s words in the letter to the Ephesians “Live as children of light-for the fruit of the light is found in all that is good and right and true. Try to find out what is pleasing to the Lord”. May Jesus ever guide us in this search, and in our path to an ever deeper love and knowledge of Him.¨
Amen
Ricardo+


St. Alban English Mission, Antigua, Guatemala is a outreach project of The St. James English parish, Episcopal Diocese of Guatemala, IARCA



The Most Reverend Armando Guerra Soria,  Rector of St. Alban Mission, Bishop of Guatemala and Primate of Central America



The Reverend Ricardo Frohmader

Associate Minister
 St. Alban Mission, Antigua
St Alban Mission holds services every Sunday at Noon
Casa Convento Concepcion, Antigua Guatemalaj, 
All are welcome - See welcome letter at the
sidebar

FROM THE DAILY OFFICE: Prayers for the surgery of Fr. Ricardo Frohmader - ¨For Health of Body and Soul¨


Friday, March 28, 2014

THE ANGLICAN EXPRESSION OF RECONCILIATION: ¨...a full-colour historical timeline of evolving relations between Indigenous peoples and the Anglican Church of Canada.¨

From the Anglican Journal

Canada: Thousands to gather for Truth and Reconciliation

¨From March 27 to 30, several thousand Indigenous and non-Indigenous people will gather in Edmonton, Alberta for the seventh and final national Truth and Reconciliation Commission event.
The Anglican delegation will include Archbishop Fred Hiltz, Primate of the Anglican Church of Canada, National Indigenous Anglican Bishop Mark MacDonald, the Venerable Michael Thompson, General Secretary, and Archbishop Terry Finlay, Primate’s Envoy on Residential Schools.
Bishops, clergy, and parishioners from the dioceses of Edmonton, Athabasca, and Calgary will also be present for TRC events including the lighting of the sacred fire, statement giving by residential school survivors, church listening circles, and a public Anglican expression of reconciliation.
The Anglican expression of reconciliation includes a full-colour historical timeline of evolving relations between Indigenous peoples and the Anglican Church of Canada. The expression is scheduled for Friday, March 28 from 4 to 6pm local time.
A number of ecumenical partners will be present in Edmonton. For the first time, the Evangelical Lutheran Church in Canada and the Canadian Council of Churches will offer expressions of reconciliation. KAIROS: Canadian Ecumenical Justice Initiatives is also coordinating a number of events, including a panel discussion on restoring the dignity of Indigenous women and girls.
Anglicans across Canada are encouraged to support the work of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission throughout the national event. Those unable to participate in person can watch livestreaming atwww.trc.ca or follow on social media on Facebook or Twitter and by using the #ABNE and #TRC hashtags. A detailed schedule of events is available here
Thanks to The Anglican Church of Canada, sidebar
Thanks to Anglican News Service, sidebar



St. Alban English Mission, Antigua, Guatemala is a outreach project of The St. James English parish, Episcopal Diocese of Guatemala, IARCA



The Most Reverend Armando Guerra Soria,  Rector of St. Alban Mission, Bishop of Guatemala and Primate of Central America



The Reverend Ricardo Frohmader

Associate Minister
 St. Alban Mission, Antigua
St Alban Mission holds services every Sunday at Noon
Casa Convento Concepcion, Antigua Guatemalaj, 
All are welcome - See welcome letter at the
sidebar

FROM THE DAILY OFFICE: Prayers for the surgery of Fr. Ricardo Frohmader - ¨For Health of Body and Soul¨



Tuesday, March 25, 2014

FROM THE DAILY OFFICE: Prayers for the surgery of Fr. Ricardo Frohmader - ¨For Health of Body and Soul¨

For the Surgery of Fr. Ricardo
April 1, 2014
Almighty God, our heavenly Father, graciously comfort your servant Ricardo in his suffering, and bless the means made use of for his cure. Fill his heart with confidence that, though at times he may be afraid, he may yet put his trust in you. Strengthen Ricardo, O God, to do what he has to do and bear what he has to bear; that, accepting your healing gifts through the skill of surgeons and nurses, he may be restored to usefulness in your world with a thankful heart; through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

For Health of Body and Soul

May God the Father bless him, God the Son heal him, God the Holy Spirit give him strength. May God the holy and undivided Trinity guard his body, save his soul and bring him safely to that heavenly country, where God Immortal lives and reigns for ever and ever. Amen.

Adapted from the Book of Common Prayer

Thank You,  Josh Thomas
Thank You,  The Daily Office, sidebar





St. Alban English Mission, Antigua, Guatemala is a outreach project of The St. James English parish, Episcopal Diocese of Guatemala, IARCA



The Most Reverend Armando Guerra Soria,  Rector of St. Alban Mission, Bishop of Guatemala and Primate of Central America



The Reverend Ricardo Frohmader

Associate Minister
 St. Alban Mission, Antigua
St Alban Mission holds services every Sunday at Noon
Casa Convento Concepcion, Antigua Guatemalaj, 
All are welcome - See welcome letter at the
sidebar

Monday, March 24, 2014

SAINT ALBANS MISSION/Antigua, Guatemala: Yesterday - our first three Baptisms

The baptisms were held at the 10 a.m. Spanish mass.  English mass is held at noon every Sunday.  

The first three baptisms at the Mission of St. Alban, Antigua, Guatemala,  Episcopal diocese of Guatemala
Yesterday at the Casa Convento Concepcion, home of St Alban Mission
Special Thanks to Elizabeth McCullough, photos



St. Alban English Mission, Antigua, Guatemala is a outreach project of The St. James English parish, Episcopal Diocese of Guatemala, IARCA



The Most Reverend Armando Guerra Soria,  Rector of St. Alban Mission, Bishop of Guatemala and Primate of Central America

The Reverend Ricardo Frohmader, Associate Minister
St Alban Mission holds services every Sunday at Noon
Casa Convento Concepcion, Antigua Guatemalaj, 
All are welcome - See welcome letter at the
sidebar

Blessed Oscar Romero, Martyr (March 25 Episcopal Calendar)


¨A Voice for the voiceless, he fearlessly denounced the poverty and injustice in El Salvador even though it surely met his death. He was prophetic in the Old Testament sense, in the mold of Isaiah, Jeremiah, Amos, and others. He insisted that the Reign of God is for the here and now as well as the hereafter....¨
Thanks to Lance's Anglican blog, sidebar

http://anglicanchurch.blogspot.com/2013/08/blessed-oscar-romero-martyr.html



St. Alban English Mission, Antigua, Guatemala is a outreach project of The St. James English parish, Episcopal Diocese of Guatemala, IARCA



The Most Reverend Armando Guerra Soria,  Rector of St. Alban Mission, Bishop of Guatemala and Primate of Central America

The Reverend Ricardo Frohmader, Associate Minister
St Alban Mission holds services every Sunday at Noon
Casa Convento Concepcion, Antigua Guatemalaj, 
All are welcome - See welcome letter at the
sidebar

Sunday, March 23, 2014

PEOPLE'S PRAYERS: ¨Prayers for Lent, Day 16: Give Up, Take On, Pray¨ Christina Brennan Lee

In a lifestyle so governed by cell phone reminders, social requirements, social media interactions, job intensity, crazy traffic, bad weather, home maintenance, laundry,  grocery shopping, meal providing, school events, exercise, sometimes church, sports tv, Xbox, online shopping, all while wearing headphones for music and streaming videos and all too rarely a full night's sleep ~ it's no wonder we have difficulty turning off all of the external stimulants of life (and perhaps a few imbibed) and finding a truly quiet moment.  How about our children? 

Guardian of my Soul and Spirit
,
The outside noise is filling me on the inside and shutting You out. I'm so easily distracted by all of the demands and opportunities of "outside" life. Please call me back from the brink of spiritual implosion. For today, I will give up 15 minutes of external stimulation and take on sitting alone, quietly, with no agenda but breathing in and breathing out. Yes, I know there's lots of other stuff to do but I will let the thoughts come in and go out.  I will let go of the thoughts that want to stick around for analysis. When the timer goes off to signal the end of the time, I will pray for the willingness and follow-through to look for guidance on meditation and the development of an interior/spiritual life.  I need the space, quiet, freedom, and connection with You to help assuage the craziness of the "outside." I know it will feel awkward at first but maybe if I just try on the 15 minute thing for awhile, it will help me cope better with the other 1,425 minutes in my day. amen.  
Evelyn Underhill  
English Mystic

1875-1941
Evelyn Underhill was one of the most widely read authors on Christian mysticism, religion, and spiritual practice in the early years of the 20th Century.  She began her writing with satirical poems moved to novels of heroic mystical journeys, and onto readable treatises on mysticism and The Spiritual Life.  Prominent in the Anglican Church, she was the first woman to give lectures to Anglican clergy as well as the first woman to lead spiritual retreats. Recognized as a theologian, Underhill sought to reconcile the spiritual realm with everyday realities that are in opposition to the Divine but redeemed when revisited with a lens of divine radiance.  Not at all proclaiming reclusiveness as a path to spiritual wholeness she said: "It seems so much easier in these days to live morally than to live beautifully. Lots of us manage to exist for years without ever sinning against society, but we sin against loveliness every hour of the day."

Thanks to Peoples's Prayers
Thanks to Christina Brennan Lee
http://prayersofthepeople.blogspot.com/2014/03/prayers-for-lent-day-16-give-up-take-on.html





St. Alban English Mission, Antigua, Guatemala is a outreach project of The St. James English parish, Episcopal Diocese of Guatemala, IARCA



The Most Reverend Armando Guerra Soria,  Rector of St. Alban Mission, Bishop of Guatemala and Primate of Central America

The Reverend Ricardo Frohmader, Associate Minister
St Alban Mission holds services every Sunday at Noon
Casa Convento Concepcion, Antigua Guatemalaj, 
All are welcome - See welcome letter at the 
sidebar

Saturday, March 22, 2014

Mozambique: ¨The Bishop Who Smashed Guns At the Altar¨ is about to retire after four decades ministry.

The Rt. Reverend Dinis Sengulane of Lebombo, diocese of southern Mozambique
¨The longest-serving Anglican bishop in the world, Bishop Dinis Sengulane of Lebombo, a church diocese which covers southern Mozambique, is to retire after nearly four decades ministry in that country.

Sengulane was consecrated as a bishop soon after Mozambique became independent from Portugal in 1975 and the ruling Frelimo party formed a one-party state. He led his diocese through the 15-year-long civil war which followed independence and played an important role in efforts which eventually brought about an end to the war. He was interviewed in late 2013 by John Allen: 

http://allafrica.com/stories/201403211253.html


Thanks to Three Rivers Episcopal, sidebar
Thanks to All Africa




St. Alban English Mission, Antigua, Guatemala is a outreach project of The St. James English parish, Episcopal Diocese of Guatemala, IARCA



The Most Reverend Armando Guerra Soria,  Rector of St. Alban Mission, Bishop of Guatemala and Primate of Central America

The Reverend Ricardo Frohmader, Associate Minister
St Alban Mission holds services every Sunday at Noon
Casa Convento Concepcion, Antigua Guatemalaj, 
All are welcome - See welcome letter at the
sidebar

NOTE:  There will be three baptisms tomorrow, Sunday, March 23, 2014, with an additional mass in Spanish at 10:00 A.M., also at Casa Convento Concepcion.  The Regular NOON English service will be held on schedule. The Rev. Ricardo Frohmader will officiate at both services.

Friday, March 21, 2014

THE DAILY OFFICE/JOSH THOMAS:¨Anglicans have prayed in their native languages since 1549 because of Archbishop of Canterbury, Thomas Cranmer

Anglicans have prayed in their native languages since 1549 because of this man, Thomas Cranmer, compiler of the Book of Common Prayer. He combined various prayers from the eight-fold monastic Liturgy of the Hours to give us Morning and Evening Prayer. He was Henry VIII’s archbishop, then was put to death under Queen Mary. (artist unknown)
Collect of Thomas Cranmer, Archbishop of Canterbury and Martyr, 1556
Merciful God, through the work of Thomas Cranmer you renewed the worship of your Church by restoring the language of the people, and through his death you revealed your power in human weakness: Grant that by your grace we may always worship you in spirit and in truth; through Jesus Christ, our only Mediator and Advocate, who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever. Amen
Thanks to Josh Thomas
Thanks to The Daily Office, sidebar



St. Alban English Mission, Antigua, Guatemala is a outreach project of The St. James English parish, Episcopal Diocese of Guatemala, IARCA



The Most Reverend Armando Guerra Soria,  Rector of St. Alban Mission, Bishop of Guatemala and Primate of Central America

The Reverend Ricardo Frohmader, Associate Minister
St Alban Mission holds services every Sunday at Noon
Casa Convento Concepcion, Antigua Guatemalaj, 
All are welcome - See welcome letter at the
sidebar

NOTE:  There will be three baptisms this coming Sunday, March 23, 2014, with an additional mass in Spanish at 10:00 A.M., also at Casa Convento Concepcion.  The Regular NOON English service will be held on schedule. The Rev. Ricardo Frohmader will officiate at both services.