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Sunday, May 25, 2014

SIEMPRE UNIDOS: Episcopal ministry in Honduras provides help to those with HIV, AIDS

HOPE, News from the diocese of Honduras, TEC

Some years ago a woman came to the Rev. Pascual P. Torres and said, “I am going to die.”

While she was a patient at a public hospital, she had been tested for HIV without her knowledge, then told the test results were positive. The staff told her: “You are going to die because you have AIDS.” The woman left the hospital and decided to jump off a bridge; she then remembered her 5-year-old daughter at home.
“She decided to kill her daughter first and then herself. But then she ran into a nurse … and she didn’t know if it was God or whatever, ” Torres said.

The nurse told the woman about Siempre Unidos, a ministry of the Episcopal Church in Honduras that provides medical care and comprehensive social services to people living with HIV and AIDS and their families.
read more, 


Thanks to The Lead, sidebar
Thanks to Episcopal News Service, sidebar
Thanks to The Rev. Pacual P. Torres, Honduras

Thanks to Siempre Unidos, Honduras diocese of the Episcopal Church

PLANNING A VISIT TO ANTIGUA, GUATEMALA?

St Alban Mission holds English services every Sunday at Noon
Casa Convento Concepcion, Antigua Guatemala, All are welcome.

See welcome letter at the sidebar.


St. Alban English Mission, Antigua, Guatemala is a outreach project of The St. James English parish, Episcopal Diocese of Guatemala, IARCA


The Most Reverend Armando Guerra Soria,  Rector of St. Alban Mission, Bishop of Guatemala and Primate of Central America

The Reverend Ricardo Frohmader 
Associate Minister of St. Alban Mission
Antigua, Guatemala

Saturday, May 24, 2014

HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVE - IARCA: The Anglican Church province in the Region of Central America


LA IGLESIA ANGLICANA DE LA REGION CENTRAL DE AMERICA (IARCA) 



Historical Perspective 

The origins of the Episcopal Churches in Central America and Panama, which date back to 18th 
century, are based fundamentally on the Church of England and the Episcopal Church in the 
United States of America, developed as follows: 

England administered two colonies in Central America: Belize (1783-1982), and the Miskitia 
(1740-1894), which were mainly located in the region of Nicaragua and Honduras. 
The natives of these islands were first evangelized by the Church of England through the 
missionary societies, specially the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel (SPG). By 1742 the 
SPG sent the first lay missionary to the Nicaraguan Miskitia. However, the Church of England 
was unable to comprehend the difference between evangelization and cultural imposition. Thus, 
it failed to evangelize the Miskitia culture. By 1848, due to the commercialization of wood and 
bananas, cheap Afro-Antillean labor was brought to the region primarily from Jamaica. In 1896, 
the Bishop of Belize laid the cornerstone of the first Anglican Church, St. Mark’s Church, in 
Bluefields, Nicaragua. 

During the XIX century and into the beginning of the XX century, as the principal lender to the 

Central American countries, England exerted strong economic influence in the region. 
Consequently, many English businessmen came to Central America and chaplaincies were 
established to serve the spiritual lives of the entrepreneurs and diplomats. In 1867 the Iglesia de 
Cristo was established in Guatemala in the British Consulate and its chaplain was even part of 
the diplomatic staff. In Costa Rica a treaty between the government and England allowed for 
jurisdiction of the chaplaincies in Honduras, Guatemala, and El Salvador was transferred from 
the Church of England to the Episcopal Church USA. In this way, in 1957 the Missionary 
District of the Episcopal Church in Central America was created with the Churches in 
Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, and Costa Rica. David E. Richards was its first Bishop. He 
resided in Costa Rica. 

Until this point in time, the Anglican/Episcopal presence in Central America resided in the 

chaplaincies that served the immigrants and their descendents from the West Indies. These 
churches were strong in Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, and Panama. No 
evangelization emphasis to the natives in Central America existed, and there was no interest to 
create national and local churches which took into consideration the cultural factor. 

Supported by Lambeth 1958 and 1968, serious efforts were made in Central America to change 
from the system of chaplaincy (foreigner in a foreign land) to that of an indigenous, national, 
autochthonous church. Consequently, in 1967 the missionary dioceses of Guatemala, Honduras, 
El Salvador, Nicaragua and Costa Rica were created with the purpose of spreading the Kingdom 
of God in each nation and revealing the Anglican spirit in the local culture, as well as forming an 
autochthonous Anglicanism. 

From that moment on the Episcopal Church in Central America tried to become incarnate into 
the local situation, to inculturate itself into each Central American country. It did not want to 
continue being the U.S. Episcopal Church in Central America, but the Episcopal Church of El 
Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua,Costa Rica, and Panama. 

In 1964, by action of the General Convention, Province IX of the Episcopal Church was created, 
and the dioceses of Central America became part of it. The Provincial Synod of Panama, in 1981, 
brought forward the autonomy theme as the goal for Province IX so that the component 

please read it all:
http://www.episcopalchurch.org/sites/default/files/downloads/iarcahistory.pdf

PLANNING A VISIT TO ANTIGUA, GUATEMALA?

St Alban Mission holds English services every Sunday at Noon
Casa Convento Concepcion, Antigua Guatemala, All are welcome.

See welcome letter at the sidebar.


St. Alban English Mission, Antigua, Guatemala is a outreach project of The St. James English parish, Episcopal Diocese of Guatemala, IARCA


The Most Reverend Armando Guerra Soria,  Rector of St. Alban Mission, Bishop of Guatemala and Primate of Central America

The Reverend Ricardo Frohmader 
Associate Minister of St. Alban Mission
Antigua, Guatemala

Friday, May 23, 2014

WHAT IS EASTER? WHY IS EASTERTIDE 50 DAYS?




Thanks to Maple Anglican, sidebar 
Thanks to The Episcopal diocese of Guatemala

PLANNING A VISIT TO ANTIGUA, GUATEMALA?

St Alban Mission holds English services every Sunday at Noon
Casa Convento Concepcion, Antigua Guatemala, All are welcome.

See welcome letter at the sidebar.



St. Alban English Mission, Antigua, Guatemala is a outreach project of The St. James English parish, Episcopal Diocese of Guatemala, IARCA


The Most Reverend Armando Guerra Soria,  Rector of St. Alban Mission, Bishop of Guatemala and Primate of Central America

The Reverend Ricardo Frohmader 
Associate Minister of St. Alban Mission
Antigua, Guatemala

Sunday, May 18, 2014

ANGLICAN WOMENS MEETING: The Church of Saint Mary the Virgin hosts meeting for the South Central Region, Diocese of Guatemala, IARCA

Anglican Women taking ACTION and sharing real life spiritual experience at St. Mary the Virgin Church,  IARCA diocese of Guatemala, Region of Central America
Norma de Guerra presents and leads the discussion segment at the Anglican Womens Meeting, South Central Region, diocese of Guatemala, this past weekend in Escuintla

PLANNING A VISIT TO ANTIGUA, GUATEMALA?

St Alban Mission holds English services every Sunday at Noon

Casa Convento Concepcion, Antigua Guatemala, All are welcome.

See welcome letter at the sidebar.


St. Alban English Mission, Antigua, Guatemala is a outreach project of The St. James English parish, Episcopal Diocese of Guatemala, IARCA



The Most Reverend Armando Guerra Soria,  Rector of St. Alban Mission, Bishop of Guatemala and Primate of Central America

The Reverend Ricardo Frohmader 
Associate Minister of St. Alban Mission
Antigua, Guatemala

Saturday, May 17, 2014

THE FIFTH SUNDAY IN EASTER: ¨Sometimes the readings appointed for a Sunday are so rich that I struggle to find something short to say about them.¨ The Rev. Ricardo Frohmader

HOMILY FOR THE FIFTH SUNDAY IN EASTER
                                        Acts 7:55-60
                                        Psalm 31:1-5, 15-16
                                        1 Peter 2:2-10
                                        John 14: 1-14
¨Sometimes the readings appointed for a Sunday are so rich that I struggle to find something short to say about them. Perhaps this morning’s readings are a case in point.
The Stoning of St. Stephen*

Our first reading is about the stoning of Stephen, the first person to be martyred for professing what came to be known as the Christian faith. Stephen is one of the first seven deacons named to take care of the daily distribution of food in the early church. They are to take care of the widows. There have been complaints that the Hebrew widows are being better served than the Greek widows. These seven deacons are ordained by the Apostles who pray over them and lay their hands on them. They are to take over the day to day details of running the church, especially feeding people. The Church was still a collectivist entity at that time.

In our reading there is a cameo appearance by someone called Saul, who seems to be operating a coatroom for the people stoning Stephen. We will hear a lot more about him, but here he appears as an enemy of the new faith and as a facilitator of violence against it and its adherents. The death of the first martyr brings to mind the bloody history of the Church as it struggled to spread the Gospel to the entire world. It also brings to mind the persecution of Christians that is ongoing in many parts of the world. An eight months pregnant woman in Sudan has been sentence to 100 lashes and then death for leaving Islam and reverting to Christianity. In literal-minded Islam, leaving Islam is apostasy, and it is punished by death. Christian minorities in Iraq, Syria and Egypt are often targeted by Muslim extremists- they are killed, their property destroyed, their churches burned. In Pakistan the only Christian in the cabinet was murdered recently, for being a Christian

In the wake of the election in India, where a political party supported by Hindu extremists, among others, has come to power, we can expect the harassment and persecution of Christians to increase. In countries like North Korea Christianity is harshly forbidden. In China only churches with official sanction can exist. The Roman Catholic Church exists underground.

The Psalm today is also a cry to the Lord for protection against enemies. I hope some of you will recognize how part of its language has made its way into Episcopal Prayers, for example “My times are in your hands”. More importantly, while the Gospels of Mark and Matthew have Jesus quoting verse 1 of Psalm 22 when he cries out “My God my God, why have you forsaken me”, in Luke’s account of his death his final words are taken from verse 5 of Psalm 31: “Into your hands I commend my spirit”. Both the reading from Acts and the Psalm reaffirm the triumph of trust in God and of faith in the face of death.

Stephen in his death throes does not call upon God the Father to receive his spirit. He cries out to the Lord Jesus. This cry is to Jesus Christ who has already ascended into heaven. Our Gospel this morning contains an extensive exposition of the relationship of the Father and the Son. Jesus is preparing his disciples for his death, resurrection and ascension. He is going to prepare a place for them in his Father’s dwelling. The Disciples do not understand. Thomas says “We do not know where you are going. How can I know the way? Jesus answers “I am the Way, and the truth and the life. No one comes to the Father except through me. If you know me, you will know my Father also”. When Phillip asks him to show the Disciples the Father, Jesus answers: “Whoever has seen me has seen the Father…Do you not believe that I am in the Father and the Father is in me? Believe me that I am in the Father and the Father is in me.”

In today’s Gospel the unicity or unity, if you will, of Father and Son is proclaimed. We will have to wait for another week to hear what Jesus has to say about the third person of the Holy Trinity, and of course in three weeks when we remember the coming of the Holy Spirit upon the Apostles on the day of Pentecost, the revelation of the Trinity will be complete. We will see that God exists in three persons, that we come to the Father through the Son, and that God is among us because his Spirit is at work in men and women in the world around us.¨Amen       

Ricardo+

*Lorenzo Lotto (1480 - 1556), Venice, Renaissance

PLANNING A VISIT TO ANTIGUA, GUATEMALA?

St Alban Mission holds English services every Sunday at Noon

Casa Convento Concepcion, Antigua Guatemala, All are welcome.

See welcome letter at the sidebar.


St. Alban English Mission, Antigua, Guatemala is a outreach project of The St. James English parish, Episcopal Diocese of Guatemala, IARCA



The Most Reverend Armando Guerra Soria,  Rector of St. Alban Mission, Bishop of Guatemala and Primate of Central America

The Reverend Ricardo Frohmader 
Associate Minister of St. Alban Mission
Antigua, Guatemala

THE CHRISTIAN WORLD AROUND US: Christians of the Nile Valley - History of the Coptic Orthodox Church (Video)



Thanks to The Daily Office, sidebar
Thanks to Josh Thomas

http://dailyoffice.org/2014/01/24/video-evensong-1-24-14-florence-li-tim-oi-1st-woman-priest-ordained-1944/

¨You worship what you do not know; we worship what we know, for salvation is from the Jews.¨

PLANNING A VISIT TO ANTIGUA, GUATEMALA?

St Alban Mission holds English services every Sunday at Noon

Casa Convento Concepcion, Antigua Guatemala, All are welcome.

See welcome letter at the sidebar.


St. Alban English Mission, Antigua, Guatemala is a outreach project of The St. James English parish, Episcopal Diocese of Guatemala, IARCA



The Most Reverend Armando Guerra Soria,  Rector of St. Alban Mission, Bishop of Guatemala and Primate of Central America

The Reverend Ricardo Frohmader 
Associate Minister of St. Alban Mission
Antigua, Guatemala

Friday, May 16, 2014

VISITA DE LA CETALC : Bishop President Julio Holguin of the ¨Theological Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean¨ meets with ++Armando and his theological team

The Rt. Reverend Julio Holguin, Bishop of Dominican Republic, TEC
Bishop Julio Holguin, President of the Board of Education for Latin America  and the Caribbean Theological vists Guatemala to learn more about Guatemalas theological training program(s). ++Armando

Bishop President of CETALC, Julio Holguin and the Presiding Bishop of IARCA, Armando Guerra

El obispo Julio Holguin de presidente de la comision de educacion teologica para A Latina y el caribe de visita en Guate para conocer mas de nuestros programas de formacion teologica


The Very Reverend Sally Hernandez,   Anglican Province of Mexico
PLANNING A VISIT TO ANTIGUA, GUATEMALA?

St Alban Mission holds English services every Sunday at Noon

Casa Convento Concepcion, Antigua Guatemala, All are welcome.

See welcome letter at the sidebar.


St. Alban English Mission, Antigua, Guatemala is a outreach project of The St. James English parish, Episcopal Diocese of Guatemala, IARCA



The Most Reverend Armando Guerra Soria,  Rector of St. Alban Mission, Bishop of Guatemala and Primate of Central America

The Reverend Ricardo Frohmader 
Associate Minister of St. Alban Mission
Antigua, Guatemala