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Saturday, January 31, 2015

NEW ANGLICAN PRIMATE ELECTED IN CENTRAL AMERICA: The Rt. Reverend Sturdie Wyman Downs, Nicaragua


ELIGE PRIMADO IGLESIA ANGLICANA DE LA REGIÓN CENTRAL DE AMÉRICA


(30/I/15) La Iglesia Anglicana de la Región Central de América (IARCA) ha electo como Primado al Ilmo. Sturdie Wyman Downs, quien asumirá este ministerio el 21 de febrero, en Nicaragua. La elección se realizó en Sínodo Extraordinario en la república El Salvador.
El Primado Electo, Revdmo. Wyman Downs de sesenta y seis años de edad, nació en Corn Island, Nicaragua, el cinco de mayo de 1947, su educación primaria y secundaria la recibió en Bluefields y su formación teológica en el Seminario San Andrés, de la ciudad de México.
Contrajo nupcias con Eufemia Gallopp en 1973, fue ordenado diácono en 1976 y sacerdote en 1978; en 1984, a los 37 años de edad, Downs fue electo y consagrado Obispo de Nicaragua, siendo el primer nicaragüense en asumir este apostolado.
Como predicador en la instalación del Ilmo. Armando Guerra, a quien sucede en el ministerio primacial; el obispo de la Iglesia Anglicana de Nicaragua (Comunión Anglicana), hizo un llamado a trabajar por la mayordomía cristiana como una responsabilidad compartida entre el clero y el laicado. “La mayordomía cristiana no va a arrancar en la Iglesia en tanto el líder no la tome en serio”, dijo hace cuatro años el Primado Electo, al exhortar al clero y la feligresía para trabajar en el fortalecimiento de la iglesia.
The Right Reverend Sturdie Wyman Downs, Primate-elect IARCA

Thanks to Mexico Anglicano

https://mexicoanglicano.wordpress.com/2015/01/31/elige-primado-iglesia-anglicana-de-la-region-central-de-america/



Wednesday, January 28, 2015

The Rev. Ricardo Frohmader: ¨Certainly we can each of us do something to bring the kingdom of heaven nearer, and to follow Jesus by being compassionate and healers in our dealings with those around us.¨




HOMILY FOR THE THIRD SUNDAY AFTER EPIPHANY
Jonah 3:1-5, 10; Psalm 62: 6-14; 1 Corinthians 7: 29-31; Mark 1:14-20
 Sometimes it seems to me that the Gospel Readings in the Revised Common Lectionary are arranged in a system of point and counterpoint. One week’s proclamation may be echoed in the following week’s Gospel, but also a different account of events may be given from one Sunday to the next. The Synoptic Gospels, of which Mark’s is the earliest, do not agree with the Gospel of John, which is the last of the Gospels composed, This is especially true with regard to the account of the calling of the disciples.
Last Sunday we heard John’s account of the calling of the disciples. The first two disciples follow Jesus after John says to them when Jesus walks by: “Behold the Lamb of God!” They follow Jesus to the place he is staying. One of them is Andrew, the brother of Simon. The other we suspect is probably John, the son of Zebedee. He is the witness, but is not named. This is characteristic of the Gospel of John- he who witnesses events does not step forward and give himself a name.
Andrew finds his brother Simon, tells him he has found the Messiah and brings him to Jesus, who tells him he will be called Cephas, rock in Aramaic, which is Petros in Latin.
The following day Jesus decides to go to Galilee-he finds Philip and says “follow me”. Philip in turn finds Nathanael, and brings him to Jesus. What we can deduce is that Andrew, John, Peter, Philip and Nathanael are on the banks of the Jordan. We know that Andrew and John are disciples of John’s. What about the other three? Andrew Peter and John are from Bethsaida on the shores of Galilee. They are fishermen. What are they doing on the banks of the Jordan- probably working and witnessing with John the Baptist. We don´t know what Philip or Nathanael did before joining Jesus, but we have to surmise that they too were following John the Baptist. Philip we are told is from Bethsaida, the city of Andrew and Peter, on the shores of the Sea of Galilee. And if all these men are following John or at least listening to his teachings, I think we can surmise that if they have livelihoods or families, that they have made provision for them.
Jesus according to John’s narrative sets out for Galilee with five disciples or followers. In Mark’s Gospel he comes to Galilee in the wake of the arrest of John the Baptist. He comes proclaiming the good news of God and saying “The time is fulfilled and the kingdom of God has come near; repent and believe in the good news”. There is no mention of any followers. As he passes along the shores of the Sea of Galilee he sees Simon and Andrew casting a net into the sea. He says to them “Follow me and I will make you fish for people”. There is an immediate response, just as there is in John’s narrative from those called-they drop everything they are doing to follow Jesus. As Jesus walks on a bit further, he finds James and John, the sons of Zebedee, in their boat, mending nets. “Immediately he called them; and they left their father Zebedee in the boat with the hired men, and followed him.” Again we witness an instantaneous response to Jesus’ call.
What will become of Simon and Andrew’s nets? We are not told, although in the story of the healing of Simon’s mother-in-law recounted in Mark 1:29-30, we know that Simon is married. There is a family we can assume, and we have to surmise that someone took over the job of fishing and of providing for the family. As for the nets and boat of James and John, the boat is fairly large-it accommodates them, their father, and the hired men, so when they leave to follow Jesus, their father and his hired men are there to continue the business.
If you came upon Jesus at the Mall or at Pricesmart, and he said: “Follow me”, would you drop everything and follow him? What about lunch? What about the engagements you might have that day? What are you going to tell your wife, your husband, your children, your bridge group, or your friends? How can you just drop everything to follow him? Sadly neither you nor I can realistically follow Jesus with the simplicity and single mindedness with which Andrew, John, Simon, Philip and Nathanael in John’s Gospel, or Simon, Andrew, James and John in Mark’s narration, answered Jesus’ call.
Before we start feeling really bad about the inadequacy of our response to Jesus’ call, I think it’s fair to ask: Is Jesus calling all of us to be like his twelve disciples? That is not Jesus’ message to his listeners. His message is a simpler one: “The time is fulfilled and the kingdom of God has come near; repent and believe in the good news”. The command to follow him absolutely is for those who are able to respond completely. For the rest of us, we are to know that the time is fulfilled: God has sent his only begotten son to live among us. The heavens have been torn open. The kingdom of God is not a remote abstraction anymore, rather it is something near, a state in which the love of God is near at hand and available to us.
Something is required of us, though, and that is repentance. We are called upon to put sin and its attendant vices away, and to repent. We are also called to believe in the good news, which is found in Jesus’ teachings, in his ministry of healing and compassion. Certainly we can each of us do something to bring the kingdom of heaven nearer, and to follow Jesus by being compassionate and healers in our dealings with those around us. This is asked of us, not under any threat of hellfire and damnation, but out of the love that God has for each and every one of us. If we are loved, are we not called to love back? I leave you with that thought.

AMEN
Ricardo+
 PLANNING TRAVEL TO GUATEMALA? 

St. Alban Mission chapel, Casa Convento Concepcion
Saint Alban Episcopal Mission, Antigua, Guatemala



You are invited to join us for English services every Sunday at Noon.

Casa Convento Concepcion, Antigua Guatemala, All are welcome.

See welcome letter at the sidebar.


St. Alban English Mission, Antigua, Guatemala is an outreach project of The St. James English parish, Episcopal Diocese of Guatemala, IARCA


The Most Reverend Armando Guerra Soria,  Rector of St. Alban Mission, Bishop of Guatemala and Primate of Central America

The Rev. Ricardo Frohmader
Associate Minister
Saint Alban Episcopal Mission
Antigua Guatemala

2366 0599; 3344 9641 

UPDATE ON PREVIOUS PRAYER REQUEST by Mary Kingman for Skip Marsh, diocese of Los Angeles, TEC:

http://saintalbansantiguaguatemala.blogspot.com/2015/01/prayer-request-for-peace-of-mind-for.html

Tuesday, January 20, 2015

A MISSION BY THE MISSION: St. Alban members deliver school supplies to the remote village of Chucalibal, San Bartolome Church (IARCA)






The Reverend Ricardo Frohmader, associate priest for St. Alban Mission/Antigua, prepared a lavish luncheon of Curries-to-go recently.  The food was a smash hit and the funds raised from the event were used to buy school supplies (the school year starts mid-late January in Guatemala) for the children of San Bartolome Episcopal (diocese of Guatemala/IARCA) Church and school.  A crew from St. Alban Mission delivered the supplies a few days ago and it was reported to be a very inspiring and fun visit to Chucalibal.  Thanks be to all who donated, sponsored and participated by bringing much needed educational tools to some of our Anglican Church children and family at San Bartolome.

   PLANNING TRAVEL TO GUATEMALA? 

St. Alban Mission chapel, Casa Convento Concepcion
Saint Alban Episcopal Mission, Antigua, Guatemala



You are invited to join us for English services every Sunday at Noon.

Casa Convento Concepcion, Antigua Guatemala, All are welcome.

See welcome letter at the sidebar.


St. Alban English Mission, Antigua, Guatemala is an outreach project of The St. James English parish, Episcopal Diocese of Guatemala, IARCA


The Most Reverend Armando Guerra Soria,  Rector of St. Alban Mission, Bishop of Guatemala and Primate of Central America

The Rev. Ricardo Frohmader
Associate Minister
Saint Alban Episcopal Mission
Antigua Guatemala


2366 0599; 3344 9641 

Monday, January 19, 2015

THE DAILY OFFICE: Morning Prayer 1.19.15 - Confession of St. Peter [USA: Martin Luther King Day]

Peter Paul Rubens, c. 1618: St. Peter
¨Jesus commanded us to preach to the people and to testify that he is the one ordained by God as judge of the living and the dead.¨ 


THE LESSONS
Ezekiel 3:4-11 (NRSV)
He said to me: Mortal, go to the house of Israel and speak my very words to them. For you are not sent to a people of obscure speech and difficult language, but to the house of Israel — not to many peoples of obscure speech and difficult language, whose words you cannot understand. Surely, if I sent you to them, they would listen to you. But the house of Israel will not listen to you, for they are not willing to listen to me; because all the house of Israel have a hard forehead and a stubborn heart. See, I have made your face hard against their faces, and your forehead hard against their foreheads. Like the hardest stone, harder than flint, I have made your forehead; do not fear them or be dismayed at their looks, for they are a rebellious house. He said to me: Mortal, all my words that I shall speak to you receive in your heart and hear with your ears; then go to the exiles, to your people, and speak to them. Say to them, “Thus says the Lord GOD”; whether they hear or refuse to hear.
Canticle: Song of Zechariah
Luke 1:68-79
Blessed are you, Lord, the God of Israel; *
you have come to your people and set them free.
You have raised up for us a mighty savior, *
born of the house of your servant David.
Through your holy prophets you promised of old
to save us from our enemies, *
from the hands of all who hate us.
To show mercy to our forebears, *
and to remember your holy covenant.
This was the oath you swore to our father Abraham, *
to set us free from the hands of our enemies,
Free to worship you without fear, *
holy and righteous before you
all the days of our life.
And you, child, shall be called the prophet of the Most High, *
for you will go before the Lord to prepare the way,
To give God’s people knowledge of salvation *
by the forgiveness of their sins.
In the tender compassion of our God *
the dawn from on high shall break upon us,
To shine on those who dwell in darkness and the shadow of death, *
and to guide our feet into the way of peace.
Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit: *
as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen.
Acts 10:34-44 (NRSV)
Then Peter began to speak to them: “I truly understand that God shows no partiality, but in every nation anyone who fears him and does what is right is acceptable to him. You know the message he sent to the people of Israel, preaching peace by Jesus Christ – he is Lord of all. That message spread throughout Judea, beginning in Galilee after the baptism that John announced: how God anointed Jesus of Nazareth with the Holy Spirit and with power; how he went about doing good and healing all who were oppressed by the devil, for God was with him. We are witnesses to all that he did both in Judea and in Jerusalem. They put him to death by hanging him on a tree; but God raised him on the third day and allowed him to appear, not to all the people but to us who were chosen by God as witnesses, and who ate and drank with him after he rose from the dead. He commanded us to preach to the people and to testify that he is the one ordained by God as judge of the living and the dead. All the prophets testify about him that everyone who believes in him receives forgiveness of sins through his name.”
While Peter was still speaking, the Holy Spirit fell upon all who heard the word.
Canticle: We Praise You, O God
Te Deum laudamus
We praise you, O God,
we acclaim you as Lord;
All creation worships you,
the Father everlasting.
To you all angels, all the powers of heaven,
the cherubim and seraphim, sing in endless praise:
Holy, holy, holy Lord, God of power and might,
heaven and earth are full of your glory.
The glorious company of apostles praise you.
The noble fellowship of prophets praise you.
The white-robed army of martyrs praise you.
Throughout the world the holy Church acclaims you:
Father, of majesty unbounded,
your true and only Son, worthy of all worship,
and the Holy Spirit, advocate and guide.
You, Christ, are the king of glory,
the eternal Son of the Father.
When you took our flesh to set us free
you humbly chose the Virgin’s womb.
You overcame the sting of death
and opened the kingdom of heaven to all believers.
You are seated at God’s right hand in glory.
We believe that you will come to be our judge.
Come then, Lord, and help your people,
bought with the price of your own blood,
and bring us with your saints
to glory everlasting.
THE APOSTLES’ CREED

I believe in God, the Father almighty,
creator of heaven and earth.
I believe in Jesus Christ, God’s only son, our Lord,
who was conceived by the Holy Spirit,
born of the Virgin Mary,
suffered under Pontius Pilate,
was crucified, died, and was buried;
he descended to the dead.
On the third day he rose again;
he ascended into heaven,
he is seated at the right hand of the Father,
and he will come again to judge the living and the dead.
I believe in the Holy Spirit,
the holy catholic Church,
the communion of saints,
the forgiveness of sins,
the resurrection of the body,
and the life everlasting. Amen.
Thanks to Josh Thomas
PLANNING TRAVEL TO GUATEMALA? 

St. Alban Mission chapel, Casa Convento Concepcion
Saint Alban Episcopal Mission, Antigua, Guatemala



You are invited to join us for English services every Sunday at Noon.

Casa Convento Concepcion, Antigua Guatemala, All are welcome.

See welcome letter at the sidebar.


St. Alban English Mission, Antigua, Guatemala is an outreach project of The St. James English parish, Episcopal Diocese of Guatemala, IARCA


The Most Reverend Armando Guerra Soria,  Rector of St. Alban Mission, Bishop of Guatemala and Primate of Central America

The Rev. Ricardo Frohmader
Associate Minister
Saint Alban Episcopal Mission
Antigua Guatemala


2366 0599; 3344 9641