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Monday, June 29, 2015

IMPORTANT TRANSITIONS AT SAINT ALBAN - ANTIGUA: New service schedule, New priest and Thank You to Fr. Ricardo - Welcome Fr. John, Elizabeth Bell, Senior Warden

Elizabeth Bell, Senior Warden
Greetings! 

This Sunday our service will be at 12noon, July 5th. 

We will be welcoming Fr. John Smith and his wife, Terri, at our service with a transition service date to be announced by the Bishop.

At our church service yesterday, we agreed to change the service time permanently from 12noon to 10am beginning July 12th. We believe that 10am is a more convenient time for many and hope to see you at church then.

We regret that Fr. Ricardo with not be able to join us at that time and thank him for all of his service during the past two years. We look forward to his visits, always.

I am in the process of collecting signatures for the formal request to establish a St. Alban Mission that we are presenting to the Bishop. I look forward to seeing you to sign, if you have not done so already. Please let me know if you would like to come by and sign at my Antigua Tours (Café Condesa) office during the week or if you prefer that I e-mail you a copy of the letter to sign. We hope to present this to the Bishop as soon as possible.

Please also remember that Leonard Clark at santosiempre@yahoo.com receives messages for our Facebook page and the blog 

http://saintalbansantiguaguatemala.blogspot.com/which also includes prayer requests and items of Episcopal interest to post.

Very best,
Elizabeth Bell
Senior Warden St. Alban

Saturday, June 27, 2015

THE REVEREND RICARDO FROHMADER: ¨Do not fear, only believe¨ (updated to include homilies for 4th and 5th Sunday after Pentecost)

HOMILY FOR THE FIFTH SUNDAY AFTER PENTECOST    
 
The Reverend Ricardo Frohmader,  St. Alban Mission,   Antigua, Guatemala
2 Samuel 1:1, 17-27;     Psalm 130;    2 Corinthians 8:7-15;         Mark 5: 21-43
“Do not fear, only believe” Jesus says in this morning’s Gospel proclamation.
We spoke last week of fear and of its pervasiveness. We spoke of how it can cripple us, cut us off from what should be our community and leave us isolated. Isolation opens the door to depression, and depression in turn opens out onto the desolate landscape of despair. This is no way to live. Faith overcomes fear. Jesus invites us to put our fears away and let faith guide us. If we trust in God, fear recedes.
Today’s readings from the Scriptures, as they delve into the realities of human sorrow, of loss of loved ones, of the death of children, of the suffering and isolation that comes with chronic disease, of hunger and famine as a reality then and now,  speak to us of aspects of our human condition that are the hardest to bear.
Our Old Testament Reading describes the grief felt by David at the death of Saul and his son Jonathan. Jonathan and David have had a very close relationship: “I am so distressed for you, my brother Jonathan; greatly beloved were you to me; your love to me was wonderful, passing the love of women.” David has lost the person he loved most in the world, and he is devastated. What comfort can there be? The Psalmist this morning waits for the Lord “for with the Lord there is mercy”. His soul waits for him, for “in his word is my hope”. And indeed in situations like this we need to wait for the Lord, to wait for his illumination and guidance.
The Epistle reading from 2 Corinthians is about a fund-raising drive that Paul is leading for the relief of believers in Jerusalem, where there is a famine. He urges the Corinthians to give because it is a question of “a fair balance between your present abundance and their need”. Paul suggests that there will be reciprocity if ever the Corinthians are in need and those in Jerusalem are enjoying abundance. You and I know that in giving we receive, and that God blesses us when we are generous.
We should be willing to share our abundance says Paul, with the hungry. You have noticed perhaps that the weather here has been dry, that Saharan dust is blowing over the Caribbean and Central America, suppressing rainfall. The many subsistence farmers of these regions who rely on rain for the success of their crops are at risk of famine. The situation that Paul is grappling with in Corinth nearly two thousand years ago is happening today, very close to home. How should we respond? Are we prepared to respond?
Our Gospel this morning relates two healings by Jesus which happened in quick succession.  One of the leaders of the synagogue comes to him and, prostrate on the ground, begs Jesus to lay his hands on his gravely ill daughter that she might live. Jesus agrees to do so. There is a large crowd around Jesus, and in this crowd is a woman who has suffered from continuous hemorrhages for twelve years, endured much under many physicians, and spent all she had. “If I but touch his clothes I will be made well” she says to herself as she comes up behind Jesus and touches his cloak. So it is-her hemorrhage ceases immediately.
Jesus is aware that power has gone forth from him when the woman touched his clothes, and he wants to know into whom it has gone. The disciples think Jesus is being ridiculous. How can you ask a question like this when there is a throng of people around you, but the woman knows what has happened, and she comes forward and falls down before him in fear and trembling, and tells him why she has touched his clothes. Jesus says to her “Daughter, your faith has made you well; go in peace and be healed of your disease”.
This episode is all the more dramatic when we understand the Jewish context of this narrative. In Jewish purity code law, blood contaminates-it is unclean. A woman’s menstrual blood contaminates even more. A woman who is menstruating is unclean for the four days of her flow, and for eight days thereafter. This woman has had unremitting blood flows for twelve years. She is unclean and cut off from her society. She appears to have been wealthy once, and to have spent much money and to have endured much under the physicians of her time. Now she is poor, and an outcast. If she once had a husband or other family she almost certainly has been rejected by them. Who could endure a woman who is unclean on a continuing basis, day after day, month after month, year after year?
If Jesus were a Pharisee he would have felt contaminated by the woman’s touching his cloak. That is perhaps why the woman identifies herself in fear and trembling. Jesus is neither a Pharisee nor does he feel defiled by the woman’s touch. He knows that some of the power that fills him has gone forth into another person, and he wants to know why, and into whom. She is just one exemplar of the healing work Jesus carries out on behalf of the outcast, the rejected, the oppressed and the ill.
While Jesus is still speaking to the woman who has been healed, people from the synagogue leader’s house come to say that his little girl has died. “Why trouble the teacher any further?” they tell the father. Jesus tells the father of the little girl: “Do not fear, only believe”. He goes to the house, letting only the father and Peter, James and John follow him. When they arrive, mourning has already begun. When Jesus tells the mourners she is only sleeping, those present laugh at him. Jesus makes everyone leave save the father and mother and the three disciples he has allowed to come with him. They enter the room where the child lies. “Talitha cum”, “little girl arise”, says Jesus. She arises and begins to walk about. He asks the persons present to not say anything, and to feed her.
Why would Jesus not want everyone to know the girl lived? Scholars call this the “messianic secret”. Jesus does not want to raise expectations that he is a messiah come to save Israel from the Romans, and to restore the kingdom of Israel. That is what people expect and want almost desperately, but that is not his mission. The Gospel of John recounts how Jesus had to flee into the wilderness because people were looking for him to crown him king. Jesus has come to proclaim the approach of the Kingdom of God and to spread healing and love to all of the unloved and rejected of Israel. He has come for our sake too. Like the little girl, we will be fed. We will be fed at his table. Let us not fear, then, but only believe!
Together let us say Prayer 58, for Guidance, found on page 832 of our prayer books:

O God, by whom the meek are guide in judgement, and light rises up in darkness for the godly: Grant us in all our doubts and uncertainties, the grace to ask what you would have us to do, that the Spirit of wisdom may save us from all false choices, and that in your light we may see light, and in your straight path may not stumble; through Jesus Christ our Lord. 
Amen
Ricardo+

(Fr. Ricardo had been on vacation and the following homily was just sent to add to our inspirational materials)

HOMILY FOR THE FOURTH SUNDAY AFTER PENTECOST
1 Samuel 17:32-49; Psalm 9: 9-20; 2 Corinthians 6: 1-13; Mark 4:35-41
Thursday morning, a little before five I was looking out an airplane window towards the East. Beautiful horizontal streaks in red, orange and gold were developing and filling an ever larger swath of the horizon. Above these glorious colors the sky was a pale and beautiful blue color. I was awed by the beauty of God’s creation, but also filled with thankfulness for having been created able to see and appreciate the glories of the coming day. Across the aisle, the window showed a Western sky still in the clutches of night, and a long line of raging thunderstorms where the flashes of lightning illuminated the gigantic thunderheads that rose up to the other side of our airplane. I felt awe , but also fear. I dread turbulence. Would our plane have to cut through this line of storms in order to land? Some days our journey takes us through a line of thunderstorms and we feel the might of the forces of nature. Thanks be to God the airplane did not have to do this last Thursday. We left the line of storms behind. The sun rose showing Guatemala verdant, emerald green, sparkling in the new born day. We landed safely.
Some days we might feel just like the disciples in the boat crossing with Jesus to the other side. Forces beyond our control may have disturbed what we wish were a pleasant journey through life, and now we feel like we are caught in a windstorm. That small boat on which we travel with friends and relatives is taking on water. Maybe that boat is like this congregation. We feel we are in danger of being swamped. And where is Jesus in all this? Why isn’t he doing his job?
In today’s Gospel Jesus is asleep in the stern of the boat, resting on a cushion. The wind is howling, waves are breaking and water is sloshing into the boat. What is going on? “Teacher do you not care that we are perishing?” the disciples say after they awaken him. Of course Jesus cares. Jesus rebukes the wind and the waves, saying “Peace! Be still!” “Then the wind ceased and there was a dead calm”. The disciples called upon Jesus in their fear and distress and he stilled the wind and the waves.
The gospel does not end here: there is another rebuke, from Jesus to the disciples: “Why are you afraid? Have you still no faith?” We can ask ourselves this question: “Why am I afraid?” If I believe in Jesus, don’t the words of Psalm 23 apply? “Yea, though I walk through the valley of the shadow of death, I will fear no evil, for thou art with me.”
I think if we turn to Jesus when the turbulence of life howls around us, and we are feeling swamped, then there will be calm, and the turmoil we experience will cease. Our external circumstances may not change much, realities will be realities. Nevertheless, getting in touch with Jesus will help us deal with the storms that sometimes rage within and around us. I believe that Jesus is with us always. We may let our relationship with him slumber, but he travels with us through life-he is our rock, he is our guide, he is our salvation. If he appears to be sleeping, it is because we have not kept in touch. We are the ones who are sleeping, or sleep walking through life. Jesus is there when we call on him.
As individuals, as families, as a congregation we encounter situations that are difficult, sometimes terrible. Loved ones die. Loved ones are taken ill and fail to recover. We fall ill, we experience pain. Our houses or our cars are robbed, maybe at gunpoint. Sometimes we are swamped with debt. Our income is small. We do not know how to make ends meet. Debts pile up. I know a person who does not come to Church on Sundays because she fears that one of the 3 buses she has to take between home and the Church might be held-up. She is in the grip of fear. Another parishioner does come by bus-she may fear, but her faith overrides the fear she might feel. Is faith, or the lack of faith maybe the key to these different approaches to riding a city bus?
Those situations and moments are when we need to get our relationship with Jesus going again, when we need to strengthen it through prayer and contemplation, when we need to put our fears aside and have faith that Jesus will see us through. This also means that we need to take stock of our own situation and ask ourselves “What does Jesus expect me to do in this situation?” “How can Jesus help me face this hour?” Jesus walks with you and me. Jesus guides you and me. Still it is our responsibility to get the decisions we make right. Jesus isn´t going to do the deciding for you or me.  He will guide, he will counsel but the decision is ours to make. He will be there to protect and try to guide, but the choices are ours. We can help ourselves by putting fear aside.
Let me put some of our dilemmas and situations in another light: This week a twelve year old boy in Guatemala City refused to kill a bus driver when ordered to by a gang. The gang then sentenced the boy to die, but let him choose between being dismembered or thrown off a trestle bridge that is 495 feet above a river bottom. The boy chose the bridge. He survived the fall. Whether he survives the lack of medical care and medicines at the national hospital is another matter. Jesus was with him when he made his choices, and when he fell, don’t you think? And we think the choices we face are terrible!
In South Carolina this past Wednesday a young white man with a 45 caliber pistol went to Bible Study at an African Methodist Episcopal Church. This is a traditionally black denomination. He was welcomed. At a certain point he pulled out his gun and began shooting. He killed nine people. He told the arresting officers that he almost didn’t commit the murders, because folks were so nice and welcoming to him. In the middle of the shootings, a survivor pleaded with him, asking him to stop and not kill any more people. He couldn’t stop he said- he had to do what he had to do, and he killed the man who pleaded with him. His aim was to start a race war. But you see, even at the last moment Jesus spoke in that young man’s mind, and almost dissuaded him from the murders.
The young man chose evil, but the choice was his to make. Some of the relatives of the victims have forgiven him, and asked that God have mercy on his soul. At least one brave man, in the middle of the killings was able to ask him to stop. That the killer did not was again a choice he made. So in this light, how do our problems and sorrows look now? And how should we in faith and with faith respond to the storms and tempests that we face?
Will you turn with me please to page 473 of your Prayer Books and let us say together Psalm 121.  This is the traditional version of the psalm and not found elsewhere in our book of common prayer
And yes,
The Lord shall preserve thee from all evil, yea it is even he that shall keep they soul.
The Lord shall preserve thy going out and thy coming in, from this time forth for evermore.
Amen
Ricardo+
A MESSAGE FROM OUR SENIOR WARDEN:  Greetings! Fr. Ricardo  is back at St. Alban for the service this Sunday, June 28th. 

I look forward to hearing from you to confirm your assistance to make preparations in the hope you may join us.

St. Alban Episcopal Mission, Antigua, Guatemala
The Episcopal Dioces of Guatemala
IARCA  -ENGLISH EUCHARIST  at NOON.
We will also be welcoming Fr. Smith at our service on July 5th with a transition service date to be announced by the Bishop. I look forward to your comments as to how best welcome our new priest!

Elizabeth Bell, Senior Warden
I am in the process of collecting signatures for the formal request to establish a St. Alban Mission that we are presenting to the Bishop. I look forward to seeing you to sign, if you have not done so already.

Very best,
Elizabeth Bell
Senior Warden, St. Alban

NEWS FROM THE EPISCOPAL CHURCH: Bishop Michael Curry, Presiding Bishop/Primate-elect




Photo

Bishop Michael Curry of North Carolina was elected in a landslide during the denomination’s national assembly on Saturday. CreditRick Bowmer/Associated Press

SALT LAKE CITY — The Episcopal Church on Saturday elected its first African-American presiding bishop during the denomination’s national assembly.

Bishop Michael Curry of North Carolina was elected in a vote by bishops at the Episcopal General Convention, the top legislative body of the church. Bishop Curry won among the bishops in a landslide, earning 121 votes. The other three candidates had 21 votes or less. The decision was affirmed on a vote of 800-12 by the House of Deputies, the voting body of clergy and lay participants at the meeting.

Bishop Curry will succeed Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori, who will complete her nine-year term on Nov. 1. She was the first female presiding bishop and the first woman to lead an Anglican national church. The New York-based Episcopal Church is the United States body of the Anglican Communion, a worldwide fellowship of churches with 80 million members and with roots in the Church of England.

Bishop Curry, 62, has been bishop of North Carolina since 2000, leading a diocese of 48,000 church members, 112 congregations and a network of ministries. He will now lead a nearly 1.9 million-member sect known for its history as the faith home of many of the nation’s Founding Fathers and presidents.

He is a Chicago native, and he and his wife, Sharon, have two daughters. Mr. Curry grew up in Buffalo, N.Y., and graduated from Hobart College and Yale Divinity School. He was ordained as a priest in North Carolina, leading parishes there and in Ohio. He then served for 12 years at St. James Church in Baltimore, Md., which was established in 1824 as the third black Episcopal congregation in the United States.

Bishop Curry is known for his emphasis on evangelism, public service and social justice.The author of “Crazy Christians: A Call to Follow Jesus,” Bishop Curry has said he prays “for a church passionately committed to making disciples.”

“At a deep level I am suggesting a churchwide spiritual revival of the Christian faith in the Episcopal way of being disciples of Jesus,” he said in the church materials introducing the candidates.

He takes charge at a time when fewer Americans are formally affiliating with a particular religious group, contributing to steady membership declines in the Episcopal Church and other liberal Protestant groups, as well as some conservative churches.

Membership in the Episcopal Church has dropped by 18 percent over the last decade. Next week, the General Convention will consider restructuring church bodies and redirecting spending to more effectively reach out to the public.

Bishop Curry supports gay rights, speaking against North Carolina’s 2012 constitutional amendment that banned same-sex marriage, which is now invalid, and allowing same-sex church weddings in the North Carolina diocese. The denomination has emerged from a period of turmoil after the 2003 election of Bishop V. Gene Robinson, the first openly gay bishop in the Anglican Communion. Many Episcopal conservatives left or distanced themselves from the national church after his election.

The convention also plans to vote on eliminating gender-specific language from church laws on marriage so religious weddings can be performed for same-sex couples. Clergy could decline to perform the ceremonies. Right now, each bishop decides whether their priests can conduct same-sex marriages

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/06/28/us/episcopal-church-elects-its-first-black-presiding-bishop.html?hp&action=click&pgtype=Homepage&module=second-column-region&region=top-news&WT.nav=top-news&_r=0

Thanks to The New York Times
Thanks to Burt Pasternak
(emphasis added, Leonardo Ricardo)

Wednesday, June 17, 2015

LAY ANGLICANA: Intercessions for Trinity + 3 (Proper 7) Year B: 21 June 2015

Thanks to Laura Sykes, Church of England, The Anglican Communion

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Calming the storm, Hitda-Codex, 11th century via Commons Wikimedia

The Collect

Almighty God, you have broken the tyranny of sin and have sent the Spirit of your Son into our hearts whereby we call you Father: give us grace to dedicate our freedom to your service, that we and all creation may be brought to the glorious liberty of the children of God; through Jesus Christ your Son our Lord, who is alive and reigns with you, in the unity of the Holy Spirit, one God, now and for ever.  Amen.

¶ The Liturgy of the Word

First Reading: 1 Samuel 17.(1a,4-11,19-23)32-49

The Philistines gathered their forces for war and assembled at Socoh in Judah.  A champion named Goliath, who was from Gath, came out of the Philistine camp. He was over nine feet tall. He had a bronze helmet on his head and wore a coat of scale armour of bronze weighing five thousand shekels; on his legs he wore bronze greaves, and a bronze javelin was slung on his back. His spear shaft was like a weaver’s rod, and its iron point weighed six hundred shekels. His shield-bearer went ahead of him. Goliath stood and shouted to the ranks of Israel, “Why do you come out and line up for battle? Am I not a Philistine, and are you not the servants of Saul? Choose a man and have him come down to me. If he is able to fight and kill me, we will become your subjects; but if I overcome him and kill him, you will become our subjects and serve us.” Then the Philistine said, “This day I defy the ranks of Israel! Give me a man and let us fight each other.” On hearing the Philistine’s words, Saul and all the Israelites were dismayed and terrified. Now Jesse said to his son David, “Take this ephah of roasted grain and these ten loaves of bread for your brothers and hurry to the camp. They are with Saul and all the men of Israel in the Valley of Elah, fighting against the Philistines.” Early in the morning David left the flock with a shepherd, loaded up and set out, as Jesse had directed. He reached the camp as the army was going out to its battle positions, shouting the war cry. Israel and the Philistines were drawing up their lines facing each other. David left his things with the keeper of supplies, ran to the battle lines and greeted his brothers. As he was talking with them, Goliath, the Philistine champion from Gath, stepped out from his lines and shouted his usual defiance, and David heard it. David said to Saul, “Let no-one lose heart on account of this Philistine; your servant will go and fight him.” Saul replied, “You are not able to go out against this Philistine and fight him; you are only a boy, and he has been a fighting man from his youth.” But David said to Saul, “Your servant has been keeping his father’s sheep. When a lion or a bear came and carried off a sheep from the flock, I went after it, struck it and rescued the sheep from its mouth. When it turned on me, I seized it by its hair, struck it and killed it. Your servant has killed both the lion and the bear; this uncircumcised Philistine will be like one of them, because he has defied the armies of the living God. The Lord who delivered me from the paw of the lion and the paw of the bear will deliver me from the hand of this Philistine.” Saul said to David, “Go, and the Lord be with you.” Then Saul dressed David in his own tunic. He put a coat of armour on him and a bronze helmet on his head. David fastened on his sword over the tunic and tried walking around, because he was not used to them. “I cannot go in these,” he said to Saul, “because I am not used to them.” So he took them off. Then he took his staff in his hand, chose five smooth stones from the stream, put them in the pouch of his shepherd’s bag and, with his sling in his hand, approached the Philistine. Meanwhile, the Philistine, with his shield-bearer in front of him, kept coming closer to David. He looked David over and saw that he was only a boy, ruddy and handsome, and he despised him. He said to David, “Am I a dog, that you come at me with sticks?” And the Philistine cursed David by his gods. “Come here,” he said, “and I’ll give your flesh to the birds of the air and the beasts of the field!” David said to the Philistine, “You come against me with sword and spear and javelin, but I come against you in the name of the Lord Almighty, the God of the armies of Israel, whom you have defied. This day the Lord will hand you over to me, and I’ll strike you down and cut off your head. Today I will give the carcasses of the Philistine army to the birds of the air and the beasts of the earth, and the whole world will know that there is a God in Israel. All those gathered here will know that it is not by sword or spear that the Lord saves; for the battle is the Lord’s, and he will give all of you into our hands.” As the Philistine moved closer to attack him, David ran quickly towards the battle line to meet him. Reaching into his bag and taking out a stone, he slung it and struck the Philistine on the forehead. The stone sank into his forehead, and he fell face down on the ground.

Psalm 9.9-20

Then will the Lord be a refuge for the oppressed, * a refuge in the time of trouble.
And those who know your name will put their trust in you, * for you, Lord, have never failed those who seek you.
Sing praises to the Lord who dwells in Zion; * declare among the peoples the things he has done.
The avenger of blood has remembered them; * he did not forget the cry of the oppressed.
Have mercy upon me, O Lord; * consider the trouble I suffer from those who hate me, you that lift me up from the gates of death;
That I may tell all your praises in the gates of the city of Zion * and rejoice in your salvation.
The nations shall sink into the pit of their making * and in the snare which they set will their own foot be taken.
The Lord makes himself known by his acts of justice; * the wicked are snared in the works of their own hands.
They shall return to the land of darkness, * all the nations that forget God.
For the needy shall not always be forgotten * and the hope of the poor shall not perish for ever.
Arise, O Lord, and let not mortals have the upper hand; * let the nations be judged before your face.
Put them in fear, O Lord, * that the nations may know themselves to be but mortal.

Second Reading: 2 Corinthians 6.1-13

As we work together with Christ, we urge you also not to accept the grace of God in vain. For he says, ‘At an acceptable time I have listened to you, and on a day of salvation I have helped you.’ See, now is the acceptable time; see, now is the day of salvation! We are putting no obstacle in anyone’s way, so that no fault may be found with our ministry, but as servants of God we have commended ourselves in every way: through great endurance, in afflictions, hardships, calamities, beatings, imprisonments, riots, labours, sleepless nights, hunger; by purity, knowledge, patience, kindness, holiness of spirit, genuine love, truthful speech, and the power of God; with the weapons of righteousness for the right hand and for the left; in honour and dishonour, in ill repute and good repute. We are treated as impostors, and yet are true; as unknown, and yet are well known; as dying, and see – we are alive; as punished, and yet not killed; as sorrowful, yet always rejoicing; as poor, yet making many rich; as having nothing, and yet possessing everything. We have spoken frankly to you Corinthians; our heart is wide open to you. There is no restriction in our affections, but only in yours. In return – I speak as to children – open wide your hearts also.¨  there is more, thanks to LAY ANGLICAN http://www.layanglicana.org/blog/2015/06/16/intercessions-for-trinity-3-proper-7-year-b-21-june-2015/lay


St. Alban Mission (English): Holy Eucharist, Sunday June 21st, Casa Convento Concepcion, Antigua, Guatemala, NOON

The Reverend Ricardo Frohmader
Greetings! Fr. Ricardo will be back on Friday and at St. Alban for the service this Sunday, June 21st. I look forward to hearing from you to confirm your assistance to make preparations in the hope you may join us.

St. Alban Episcopal Mission, Antigua, Guatemala
The Episcopal Dioces of Guatemala
IARCA
We will also be welcoming Fr. Smith at our service on July 5th with a transition service date to be announced by the Bishop. I look forward to your comments as to how best welcome our new priest!

Elizabeth Bell, Senior Warden
I am in the process of collecting signatures for the formal request to establish a St. Alban Mission that we are presenting to the Bishop. I look forward to seeing you to sign, if you have not done so already.

Very best,
Elizabeth Bell
Senior Warden, St. Alban

Tuesday, June 16, 2015

St. Alban Mission (English): Holy Eucharist, Sunday June 21st, Casa Convento Concepcion, Antigua, Guatemala, NOON

The Reverend Ricardo Frohmader
Greetings! Fr. Ricardo will be back on Friday and at St. Alban for the service this Sunday, June 21st. I look forward to hearing from you to confirm your assistance to make preparations in the hope you may join us.

St. Alban Episcopal Mission, Antigua, Guatemala
The Episcopal Dioces of Guatemala
IARCA
We will also be welcoming Fr. Smith at our service on July 5th with a transition service date to be announced by the Bishop. I look forward to your comments as to how best welcome our new priest!

Elizabeth Bell, Senior Warden
I am in the process of collecting signatures for the formal request to establish a St. Alban Mission that we are presenting to the Bishop. I look forward to seeing you to sign, if you have not done so already.

Very best,
Elizabeth Bell
Senior Warden, St. Alban

Thursday, June 11, 2015

VACATION SCHEDULE: Morning Prayer June 14th at 10:00 A.M. - Casa Convento Concepcion/Antigua



Greetings! 

Just a reminder that Fr. Ricardo is on vacation. We will have Morning Prayer on Sunday, June 14th at 10am.

I look forward to hearing from you to confirm your assistance to make preparations in the hope you may join us.

We will also be welcoming Fr. Smith at our 12noon service on July 5th with a transition service date to be announced by the Bishop. I look forward to your comments as to how best welcome our new priest!

I am in the process of collecting signatures for the formal request to establish a St. Alban Mission that we are presenting to Bishop. I look forward to seeing you to sign, if you have not done so already.

Elizabeth Bell
Senior Warden
St Alban Episcopal Mission
Antigua, Guatemala